tel. (818) 898-1200      117 Macneil Street, San Fernando, CA 91340

IF YOU ARE EXPERIENCING A LIFE-THREATENING INCIDENT, CALL 9-1-1 IMMEDIATELY

COVID-19 (CORONAVIRUS) IN LOS ANGELES COUNTY*

CASES

6,910

DEATHS

169

CASES IN SAN FERNANDO

12

* This data is provided by the County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health and includes cases reported by Long Beach and Pasadena Health Departments as of 4/7/20; 12 pm.

NOVEL CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19)

DOWNLOAD COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH CURRENT SAFER AT HOME HEALTH ORDER

Safer at Home Public Health Order (3/21/20):
ENGLISH  
 

Safer at Home Public Health Order (Clarification Regarding Essential Workers; 3/31/20):
ENGLISH

 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) (3/27/20):
ENGLISH | SPANISH 

 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) for Businesses (3/30/20) :
ENGLISH | SPANISH  

 

Home Isolation Health Order (4/1/20):
ENGLISH

 

Home Quarantine Health Order (4/1/20):
ENGLISH

 

Temporary Closure of Beaches and Trails Health Order (3/27/20):
ENGLISH

 

Guidance for Cloth Face Coverings (4/2/20):
ENGLISH  

CITY OF SAN FERNANDO UPDATES

(4/8/20)

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON (SCE) UPDATE & ASSISTANCE 

  • SCE has suspended all service disconnections for nonpayment, and are waiving late fees for residential and business customers that have been financially impacted by the pandemic.
  • SCE will continue to perform emergency work and critical wildfire prevention work and continue to keep the lights on, and has temporarily postponed all noncritical outages. 

DISCOUNTED RATE INFORMATION

To get information on discounted rate programs, payment assistance and extensions as well as budget plans and budget assistance you can visit sce.com/customer-service or call 1-800-950-2356.  

MEDICAL BASELINE CUSTOMER 

If you are a medical baseline customer which means you depend on electrically powered medical equipment you may qualify for additional discounts. Please call 1-800-447-6620.

CALIFORNIA ALTERNATE RATES FOR ENERGY (CARE)

The CARE program provides a discount of about 30% on monthly electric bills for eligible customers. Households of two would be eligible if the household income is below $32,920 per year. For more information: www.sce.com/care.  

FAMILY ELECTRIC RATE ASSISTANCE (FERA)

FERA provides a reduced monthly discount of 18% for income-qualified households of three or more if the household income is below $51,950 per year. For more information: www.sce.com/fera. 

UPDATE YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION WITH SCE

Residents are encouraged to take advantage of these resources and tools and to update contact information with SCE so that you may receive notices of planned outages and any emergency work that may impact your service. You can provide your updated contact information by calling 1-800-655-4555.

(4/7/20)

LOS ANGELES COUNTY COMMITTED TO FINANCIAL RESOURCES FOR EMPLOYEES, EMPLOYERS, AND SENIORS DURING COVID-19 CRISIS

The County of Los Angeles is committed to providing residents and their families with important resources throughout the COVID-19 crisis that address financial stressors. 

UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE

EDD WORKSHARE PROGRAM FOR EMPLOYERS

EMPLOYER ASSISTANCE GRANT FUND

Last week, California Governor Gavin Newsom announced that Los Angeles County will receive state funding to assist local workers and businesses during this crisis. The funding will be used to provide employment, training, and other supportive services to displaced workers, as well as rapid response and layoff aversion services to small and mid-sized businesses.  The Los Angeles County Department of Workforce Development, Aging and Community Services (WDACS) will launch this program, the Employer Assistance Grant Fund, on April 8, 2020 at 8 a.m. 

    • Application link for the Employer Assistance Grant Fund (Wednesday, April 8 at 8 a.m., will close after 150 applications have been received): workforce.lacounty.gov

LA COUNTY BUSINESS AND WORKER DISASTER HELP CENTER

This help center provides relief for businesses and workers. It is staffed with dedicated, helpful support in multiple languages, including Spanish, Korean, Mandarin Chinese, and Armenian. It guides businesses through the process to receive small business loans from the federal government, and provides connections to Layoff Aversion services, tax credits, and comprehensive support for workers.

AMERICA’S JOB CENTERS OF CALIFORNIA (AJCC)

Provides workers and job seekers many of the resources normally available in-person at AJCCs, including job openings, online education, and information for recently laid-off workers.

SENIOR MEALS

WDACS and the City of Los Angeles Department of Aging provide free, home-delivered meals to older adults age 60 and older who are impacted by the COVID-19 crisis.  

  • Sign up if you need this service at 1-800-510-2020. 

FRAUDS

All LA County residents, especially seniors, should be on the lookout for frauds and schemes that include coronavirus treatments and vaccines, as well as attempts to obtain your Medicare number or other personal information.

  • For additional information on healthcare fraud, please visit cahealthadvocates.org or call 1-855-613-7080. 

ELDER ABUSE

If you are concerned that someone you care about may be the victim of elder or dependent adult abuse, don’t be silent.

  • Report it to Adult Protective Services: 1-877-477-3646 

(4/7/20)

LOS ANGELES COUNTY WDACS CRITICAL DELIVERY SERVICE  

The need for delivery services for our aging population has significantly increased as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and the California Safer at Home Initiative. Through a grant provided by the Federal Transportation Authority (FTA) and administered by the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), Workforce Development, Aging, and Community Services (WDACS) Department New Freedom Transportation has launched a temporary delivery program called Critical Delivery Service (CDS) to deliver food and other vital necessities to individuals who are unable to leave their homes due to COVID-19. The Critical Delivery Service program is intended to address delivery service gaps and barriers for our older adults and individuals with disabilities while enabling them to stay healthy and thrive at home during this health crisis.

WHO ARE THE DELIVERIES FOR AND HOW CAN DELIVERIES BE SCHEDULED?

Delivery Services are reserved for those who meet at least one of the following criteria:

  • Aged 60 years and older
  • Individual with a permanent or temporary disability
  • Dependent Adult (aged 18-59 yrs.)
    • Persons who have physical or mental limitations that restrict their ability to carry out Activities of Daily Living (ADL) or Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL)
  • No Application Process Required just call the call center to enroll  
  • Call the New Freedom Hotline and ask for Deliveries: (888) 863-7411 and or email newfreedom@wdacs.lacounty.gov we will respond to emails within 24 hours
  • Schedule Deliveries can occur Monday through Friday
  • 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.    
     

WHAT IS BEING DELIVERED?

  • Food, groceries, household items, medication and other type of vital necessities through grocery stores pick up ONLY
  • Items must be pre-paid and ready for pick-up
  • There is no cost to client for delivery    
     

WHERE CAN ITEMS BE DELIVERED?

  • To and From Anywhere in Los Angeles County    
     

WHEN CAN ITEMS BE DELIVERED?

  • 7 Days a week; 24 hours a day with pre-scheduled pick ups
  • Individuals can utilize this service up to 4 times per month (maximum)    
     

For more information, contact: 

New Freedom Transportation Critical Delivery Service: (888) 863-7411 | NewFreedom@wdacs.lacounty.gov | https://newfreedom.lacounty.gov/

Download DACS Critical Delivery Services Flyer: ENGLISH

(4/7/20)

FREE FOOD BANKS IN THE SAN FERNANDO VALLEY

Current list of free food banks providing free food to families in the SFV communities.  Please check the website for the days and hours of food pantry distribution.

AGENCY ADDRESS PHONE NO. WEBSITE
MEND 10641 San Fernando Rd, Pacoima, CA 91331 mendpoverty.org  
North Valley Caring Services 15453 Rayen St, North Hills, CA 91343 (818) 891-0481 nvcsinc.org
San Fernando Valley Rescue Mission Drive through food bank at Northridge Mall Parking Lot  Next to California Pizza Kitchen (818) 785-4476 sfvrescuemission.org

(4/7/20)

FACE COVERINGS & THINGS TO TRY WHILE PHYSICAL DISTANCING

ICYMI: FACE COVERING GUIDANCE

Whenever you are leaving your home to procure or provide essential services, either in public or in private settings, LA County is asking residents to please wear a clean cloth face covering at all times.

Face coverings are not a substitute for our most powerful tools to slow the spread of COVID-19: staying home and practicing physical distancing – staying six feet away from all people – at all times. However, face coverings can:

  • help prevent you from infecting others; and
  • help save medical masks for healthcare workers or other essential workers that take care of people who are sick – or may be in contact with people who may be sick 

If you are already using cloth face coverings while out and about, thank you for taking this step to slow the spread of COVID-19. If you aren’t, help us save lives by doing so.

For tips on how to make your own cloth face covering, click here. Or watch a video by Dr. Jerome Adams, U.S. Surgeon General, for DIY instructions.

Read more about LA County’s Cloth Face Covering Guidance here.

THINGS TO TRY WHILE PHYSICAL DISTANCING

While LA County residents focus on physical distancing in the fight against COVID-19, we’d like to take a moment offer a few ideas on how to beat the blues, entertain kids, learn something new, or remain social – for free!

The following suggestions are brought to you by the LA County Library, the Department of Arts & Culture, and creative and resilient artists and organizations who are finding ways of creating and engaging with you (from the comfort of your own home):

For the Young:

For the Young-at-Heart:

For All Ages:

For more information on what LA County Library offers, visit lacountylibrary.org or reach Library staff via:

  • Phone: Click here to locate your local library (Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.- 6:00 p.m)
  • Text: (626) 394-4019 (Monday-Friday, Noon-6:00 p.m.)
  • Email or Chat (Monday-Friday, Noon-6:00 p.m.) 

People with no symptoms can spread novel coronavirus, too. The best way to stop the spread is to #stayhome. Homebodies help save lives! #COVID19 #SaferAtHome

Las personas sin síntomas también pueden transmitir el nuevo coronavirus. La mejor manera de detener la propagación es #stayhome. ¡Los hogareños ayudan a salvar vidas! #COVID19 #MasSeguroEnCasa

(4/6/20)

LOS ANGELES COUNTY ANNOUNCES NEW $500K EMPLOYER ASSISTANCE GRANT FUND & TESTING SITES  

NEW LOS ANGELES COUNTY $500,000 EMPLOYER ASSISTANCE GRANT FUND

The County of Los Angeles is launching a $500,000 Employer Assistance Grant Fund to help LA County businesses, including nonprofits and social enterprises, affected by COVID-19. This fund and its application site launches this Wednesday, April 8 at 8:00 a.m.

Individual businesses may be awarded up to $10,000 based on demonstrated need. Approximately 25% of awards will be reserved for social enterprises that demonstrate a need and ability to serve vulnerable populations. Applications will be processed on a first-come-first-served basis, and will close once 150 applications are received.

A webinar to guide businesses through the application process will be held April 7 at 1:30 p.m. To join the webinar click here or call (323) 776-6996 and use access code 352-425-128.

To learn if you qualify, click here.

To apply, visit: https://workforce.lacounty.gov/

Questions? E-mail bizdev@wdacs.lacounty.gov  

 

TESTING SITES

Los Angeles County is working to bring testing sites to areas of the County where testing service gaps may exist. This week, testing sites look to open at Charles H. Drew University of Medicine and Science, as well as in East Los Angeles and Santa Clarita.

Testing is free and open to any member of the public who qualifies for testing. No one will be turned away, regardless of immigration status or lack of insurance coverage. 

To be eligible for testing, you must meet at least one of the following criteria:

  • You have symptoms and are 65 and older;
  • You have symptoms and have chronic health conditions; or
  • You are subject to a mandatory 14 day quarantine period due to a confirmed COVID-19 exposure (with more than 7 days of quarantine remaining)

If you’re eligible for testing, you must make an appointment, in order to get tested. Schedule an appointment by:

The County of Los Angeles continues to expand it’s network of testing sites. For the latest information on drive-up, mobile testing sites, click here

(4/6/20)

VALLEY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE ANNOUNCES EMPLOYER CONCERNS WEBINAR: NAVIGATING COVID-19  

Join Sue M. Bendavid, employment attorney with Lewitt Hackman for an informational presentation to help employers navigate through COVID-19 concerns.

Topics include:

  • Communicating with Employees
  • DOL Guidance
  • Essential Workers
  • Furloughs and Layoffs
  • Leaves of Absence
  • Paid Sick
  • Stay at home orders
  • Telecommuting & Business Expenses
  • Wage & Hour Issues 

April 8, 2020; 10 am to 11 am | CLICK HERE TO REGISTER or Email info@economicalliance.org

(4/6/20)

CHARTER SCHOOL’S GRAB-AND-GO MEAL CENTERS

Los Angeles County Charter Schools who are distributing free food to students via Grb-and-Go pick-up distribution in response to closures during the COVID-19 public health crisis. The list will be updated as additional schools open food distribution points. All children under the age of 18, what schoold they attend or where they live, can receive free meals from each of these sites.

Locations closest to the City of San Fernando:

School Daily Service Hours School Site Address
San Fernando High School 7 am to 11 am 11333 O’Melveny Street, San Fernando, CA 91340
PUC Nueva Esperanza 7:30 am to 10:30 am 1218 N. Fourth Street, San Fernando, CA 91340
Vaughn Next Century Learning Center 11 am to 1 pm (Closed during Spring Break) 11200 Herrick Ave, Pacoima, CA 91331

Los Angeles County Charter School Grab and Go List: CLICK HERE

Grab and Go Location Map (LAUSD & Charter School): CLICK HERE

(4/6/20)

UPDATE FROM LOS ANGELES COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF PARKS & RECREATION ON CLOSURES FOR EASTER (SUNDAY, APRIL 12, 2020) IN RESPONSE TO COVID-19

In Los Angeles County and beyond, we are all adjusting to the changes to our daily lives as we collectively fight to “flatten the curve” of the coronavirus (COVID-19). We know that many of these changes have caused disruption in the way we live, work, and play. We also know that parks are vital to the health and joy of our communities in Los Angeles County, and we believe that parks remain a haven, especially during this difficult time.

With the top priority being the health and safety of our park guests, team members, and community, the Los Angeles County Department of Parks and Recreation (LA County Parks) continues to assess daily operations and implement precautionary measures in response to COVID-19.

As directed by the County’s “Safer at Home” Order and guidance from State and local officials, we want to remind all park guests that 6 feet of physical distancing is required, and group gatherings are prohibited at all LA County Parks locations.

LA County Parks will close all botanic gardens, lakes, and local, community and regional parks to the public on Sunday, April 12, in an effort to prevent the spread of COVID-19. This was a difficult decision as we know Easter is day of celebration for many park guests and fun tradition for LA County Parks. However, the anticipated high volume of visitors would make it impossible for the public to implement safe physical distancing practices or prevent group gathering.

All LA County Parks and Recreation facilities and open space locations are closed on Easter, Sunday, April 12, including:

  • All multi-use trails closed until further notice. For a complete list, please see https://trails.lacounty.gov/TrailsList.
  • All play and sports amenities closed until further notice. This includes but is not limited to playgrounds, fitness equipment areas, basketball courts, skate parks, baseball/soccer/multi-use fields, tennis courts/pickleball, volleyball, and lawn bowling.
  • LA County golf courses are closed until further notice.
  • All restrooms are closed for Easter.
  • All Botanic gardens are closed for Easter.
  • Park buildings & indoor facilities are closed to the public, including indoor gymnasiums, computer labs, multi-purpose rooms, classrooms, aquatics centers/pools, indoor golf facilities & nature centers. 

We appreciate your support and understanding as we adapt to this fluid situation. We know that you rely on our programs as consistent and crucial resources. We hope these extraordinary efforts will help with the County and global effort to stop the spread of COVID-19.

We are working closely with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (Public Health) to ensure that our Parks community receives credible information and guidance during this challenging time. We encourage you to visit the Public Health website for information and guidance, available in multiple languages, on COVID-19: http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/media/Coronavirus.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact (626) 588-5364 or info@parks.lacounty.gov.

(4/6/20)

DEPARTMENT OF CHILDREN & FAMILY SERVICES CALL ON THE COMMUNITY TO BE THE VOICE FOR CHILDREN AMID CORONAVIRUS SCHOOL CLOSURES

On the heels of the announcement that students will remain out of school for the remainder of the academic year due to the current public health crisis, the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) is calling on residents to help ensure that children remain safe. 

During this unprecedented time, families may experience higher levels of stress and uncertainty and the department is asking that community members be observant of children who may be experiencing neglect or abuse.

DCFS Director Bobby D. Cagle said that with children out of the line of sight of mandated reporters, such as teachers and medical personnel, the concern for child safety has significantly increased.

“Social workers rely heavily on mandated reporters to initiate contact with our department in order for us to protect children,” Director Cagle said. “With this safeguard now gone, I am calling on Los Angeles County residents to be the voice for children who may be experiencing physical abuse, severe food insecurity or other forms of neglect.”   

April marks National Child Abuse Prevention Month, an observance that strives to bring awareness of tools and resources available to families in need of support. The most common type of maltreatment is neglect. Federal statistics reveal that in 2019 an estimated 678,000 children were found to be victims of child abuse or neglect nationwide and, the year before, 4.3 million reports were made involving some 7.8 million children.

For those who work with families at risk of becoming involved with the child welfare system, the goal is to help foster healthy relationships by imparting coping strategies to navigate difficult circumstances that can lead to neglect or abuse.

This objective, dovetails with DCFS’ prevention and aftercare services.  During the 2019-2020 fiscal year, DCFS invested nearly $20 million in services including provision of basic goods, parenting education, financial literacy and peer support groups.  These services are available regardless of age, immigration or insurance status, for as long as needed.

Recognizing that family dynamics may be challenging even on the best of days, Director Cagle stressed the need for child abuse prevention awareness and community involvement now more than ever.

“This situation is sure to test the limits of even the most patient individuals,” he said. “But I want to emphasize that there are services available in the community to help.  If you or someone you know is in need of extra support during this time of heightened uncertainty, please contact DCFS to find out what services are available in your area.”

To learn more about child abuse prevention month and how you can help, please visit: childwelfare.gov/topics/preventing/preventionmonth/about/.

The DCFS Child Protection Hotline may be reached at 800-540-4000.

(4/6/20)

FREE SHOWER SERVICES OFFERED BY THE Y

Temporary shower program hours will be Monday thru Friday from 9am-2pm.

Agency Address
Anderson Munger Family YMCA 4301 W Third St, Los Angeles, CA 90020
Collins-Katz Family YMCA 1466 S. Westgate Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90025
Hollywood YMCA 1553 Schrader Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90028
Ketchum-Downtown YMCA 401 S. Hope St, Los Angeles, CA 90071
Mid-Valley Family YMCA 6901 Lennox Ave, Van Nuys, CA 91405
North Valley Family YMCA 11336 Corbin Ave, Northridge, CA 91326
Weingart YMCA Wellness & Acquatic Center 9900 S. Vermont Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90044
Westchester Family YMCA 8015 S. Sepulveda Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90045
West Valley Family YMCA 18810 Vanowen St, Reseda, CA 91335

Download Y Free Shower Service Flyer: ENGLISH | SPANISH

(4/3/20)

COVID-19 MAPPING, SOCIAL SERVICES, & DRIVE-UP MOBILE TESTING SITES

COVID-19 MAPPING

From park closures to confirmed cases of COVID-19, these GIS tools and dashboards map Los Angeles County’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

These dashboards contain data compiled by LA County’s Department’s of Public Health, Health Services, Parks and Recreation, the Office of Education, and the Office of Emergency Management.

SOCIAL SERVICES: FOOD, CASH, HEALTH OR IN-HOME CARE PROGRAMS

In times of crisis, the Department of Public Social Services has provided LA County residents with critical support. Today’s COVID-19 health crisis is no different. The County of Los Angeles wants to assure individuals and families that while DPSS offices are closed, DPSS experts are still open for business – and ready to serve you.

New Customers:

  • To learn more or apply online, visit: www.dps.lacounty.gov
  • For assistance over the phone, call (866) 613-3777. 

Existing Customers:

  • CalFresh, CalWORKs, General Relief, Refugee Cash Assistance or Cash Assistance for Immigrants: if you receive these benefits, you will continue at the same level for March, April and May 2020. You do not have to submit a re-certification packet & there is no need for you to call our offices.
  • Medi-Cal: your benefits will continue for March, April and May 2020. However, it is important that you maintain the renewal reporting requirement for Medi-cal (or your benefits will be terminated after the 90 days). If you received your renewal packet, you can mail or upload the packet via our website.
  • In-Home Care: in-home supportive service reassessments have been suspended for 90 days. However, our social workers will continue to contact customers to conduct assessments and perform welfare checks over the telephone. 

DRIVE-UP MOBILE TESTING SITES

Drive-up mobile testing sites for #COVID19 are now open in LA County and City of LA. Learn more: http://covid19.lacounty.gov/testing

Spanish: Los sitios automatizados móviles de prueba para el #COVID19 ahora están abiertos en el Condado de Los Angeles y la Ciudad de Los Angeles. Obtenga más información: http://covid19.lacounty.gov/testing

(4/3/20)

ELECTRONIC BENEFIT TRANSFER (EBT) CERTIFICATION

  • Retail food stores (grocery stores) and Farmers Markets that are interested in being certified to accept EBT should be directed to the USDA website: https://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/apply-to-accept to apply.
  • Restaurants that are interested in being certified to accept EBT as part of the Restaurant Meals Program must send an inquiry to restaurantmealsprogram@dpss.lacounty.gov.  CF Program will initiate the process.
  • All other agencies that provide meals that are interested in being certified to accept EBT must call the USDA SNAP Retailer Service Center at 1-877-823-4369. 

(4/2/20)

INCREASED UTILITY USAGE & BILL ASSISTANCE

With most Californians staying at home in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, residential energy use has increased by 15 to 20% (for electric) and 5 to 50% (for gas) and utility bills will go up. The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) is working to help consumers manage their energy bills and usage.

Customers who have lost their income should call their utility today to receive a 20 to 35% discount on their bills through the California Alternate Rates for Energy (CARE) program and/or the Family Electric Rate Assistance (FERA) program: www.cpuc.ca.gov/General.aspx?id=976. The CPUC has a similar program for telecommunication customers, California LifeLine: www.cpuc.ca.gov/lifeline.

Additionally, CPUC has worked with utilities to provide the Climate Credit in April, which will help off-set higher bills.The Climate Credit is from a state program that requires electricity providers, natural gas providers, and other large industries that emit greenhouse gases to buy carbon pollution permits.  The credit is the utilities’ customer’s share of the payments from the program.

CPUC is working on additional actions to help reduce the impacts of increased residential demand on energy bills during the summer months including the possibility of additional bill credits and changes to the overall rate structures.

Finally, there are also simple, no-cost energy behaviors that can help save Californians energy and money during this difficult time:

  • On cooler days, set thermostats to 68 or lower during the day/62 at night
  • Unplug unused devices and/or turn off power strips
  • Open blinds/curtains on sunny days to avoid using too many lights
  • Wait to use dishwasher when it’s full 

Turn down screen brightness and use eco-mode features on work from home and entertainment devices.

(4/1/20)

CITY OF SAN FERNANDO URGES THE COMMUNITY TO WEAR CLOTH FACE COVERINGS

CALIFORNIA PUBLIC HEALTH OFFICIALS RELEASE GUIDANCE ON USE OF CLOTH FACE COVERINGS 

Social distancing and hand washing are still best actions Californians can take to fight COVID-19

California’s public health officials today released guidance on the use of cloth face coverings to protect against COVID-19 for Californians who must leave their homes to conduct essential activities. The guidance does not require people to wear face coverings – and is not a substitute for the state’s current guidance regarding social distancing and hand washing. The state also does not recommend Californians use N-95 or surgical masks, which are needed for our health care workers and first responders who will be there for when our lives at risk.

“Face coverings are not a substitute for physical distancing or frequent hand washing, which we know are amongst the most effective ways to reduce the spread of COVID-19,” said Dr. Sonia Angell, Director of the California Department of Public Health and State Health Officer. “Wearing a cloth face covering could provide some additional benefit by acting as a reminder for other people to keep their distance, and it could help reduce the spread of infectious particles from those who could be infected but don’t have symptoms.”

“Face coverings could provide some additional protection against COVID-19, but Californians should not have a false sense of security if they choose to wear them. Make sure you’re also staying 6 feet away from other people if you have to leave your home to get groceries or prescriptions,” said California Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly.

The new guidance reminds Californians that the best defense against COVID-19 continues to be: 

  • Staying at home and physical distancing 
  • Washing hands frequently
  • Avoiding touching eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands
  • Avoiding being around sick people 

The use of cloth face coverings could reduce the transmission of COVID-19 by individuals who do not have symptoms and may reinforce physical distancing. Public health officials also caution that face coverings may increase risk if users reduce their use of strong defenses such as physical distancing and frequent hand washing.

For more information, please see the Face Coverings Guidance.

Download County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health Guidance for Cloth Face Coverings: ENGLISH

Download CDC Use of Cloth Face Coverings & DIY Cloth Face Covering Instructions: ENGLISH  

(4/1/20)

MORATORIUM ON RESIDENTIAL OR COMMERCIAL EVICTIONS 

Governor Newsom issued Executive Order N-28-20, placing a moratorium on residential evictions for Tenants that meet certain conditions, which are listed below:

  • A Tenant shall have first notified the Landlord in writing before rent is due, or within a reasonable period of time afterwards, not to exceed thirty (30) calendar days, that the Tenant needs to delay all or some payment of rent attributable to an inability to pay the full amount due to reasons related to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.
  • Tenant was sick with COVID-19, unable to work, and was unable to use paid leave while sick.
  • Tenant experienced a lay-off, work furlough, reduction in work hours or income resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Tenant needed to miss work to care for a minor child whose school was closed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic or care for a household or family member was sick with COVID-19 AND the tenant was unable to use paid leave. 

If you meet any of the criteria above and would like to delay all or part of your rent payment, please send a notice to your Landlord immediately.  Be sure to include your reason for requesting a delay in payment.  Please note that you will need to provide some form of documentation as evidence that you meet one of the criteria.

This Moratorium is statewide and currently applies to San Fernando residents.  In addition, on April 6, 2020, the San Fernando City Council will be considering a local Ordinance.

Download California Executive Order N-28-20: ENGLISH

(4/1/20)

LOS ANGELES COUNTY EMPHASIZES PROTECTIONS FOR TENANTS AFFECTED BY COVID-19 

Rent is due for many Los Angeles County residents who have lost their source of income due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The County wants the public to know that there are protections in place for renters who are at-risk of being evicted due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Chair of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors Kathryn Barger has signed an executive order banning landlords from evicting residential renters affected by the coronavirus. The ban is in place through May 31, 2020. The order states: 

“During this local emergency, and in the interest of protecting the public health and preventing transmission of COVID-19, it is essential to avoid unnecessary housing displacement, protect the County’s affordable housing stock, and prevent housed individuals from falling into homelessness.”

The order protects people who have suffered “financial impacts” due to the coronavirus. This means a substantial loss of household income due to business closure, loss of compensable hours of work or wages, layoffs, extraordinary out-of-pocket medical expenses or child care needs arising from school closures.

The protection extends to those who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or who are caring for someone diagnosed with the virus. The order also protects individuals who have suffered financial impacts due to compliance with the County’s recommendation to stay at home, self-quarantine or due to avoiding congregating with others during the state of emergency.

Under the order, tenants must notify their landlord in writing within a week after their rent is due —  unless there are extenuating circumstances — that they are unable to pay their rent because of the pandemic.

The following are other important facts and protections in place:

  • The executive order ensures that all people in the County will continue to have access to running water during this public health crisis. This enables compliance with public health guidelines to wash hands often and have access to clean drinking water.
  • The order ensures that all customers in the County who receive power services from Southern California California Edison and Southern California Gas Company continue to have access to electricity so they may receive crucial COVID-19 information, keep critical medical equipment functioning and utilize power as needed.
  • Public utilities have announced that they will suspend service disconnections for nonpayment and waive late fees, effective immediately, for residential and business customers impacted by the COVID-19 crisis.
  • The moratorium applies to only unincorporated L.A. County. 
  • Los Angeles, Beverly Hills, Burbank, Culver City, Glendale, Long Beach, Pasadena, Santa Monica, South Pasadena, and West Hollywood have issued similar orders. 

If you have questions about landlord-tenant issues, please visit the Los Angeles County Department of Consumer and Business Affairs online at rent.lacounty.gov, call (833) 223-RENT (7368) or email rent@dcba.lacounty.gov.

Download County of Los Angeles Executive Order: ENGLISH

(4/1/20)

LOS ANGELES COUNTY OFFERS RELIEF, NEW PUBLIC HEALTH GUIDELINES & THE 2020 CENSUS 

RELIEF

If you or a loved one has lost your job, or just need assistance, the County of Los Angeles has a number of ways to help. For help with accessing food, cash, health or in-home care programs, apply online at www.dpss.lacounty.gov.

For assistance over the phone, call (866) 613-3777.

NEW GUIDELINES FOR LA COUNTY’S DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Emerging evidence suggests that there may be a significant number of people infected with COVID-19 who lack symptoms and, yet, are capable of spreading the virus to others.

New guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests that we need to think about using universal precautions all the time – assuming that each of us can infect others even when we aren’t sick.

As a result, the Department of Public Health has updated its FAQ with answers to a number of questions, including:

  • What should I do if I think I may have been exposed to COVID-19?
  • What should I do if I have symptoms and think I may have been exposed to COVID-19?
  • Can I get tested for COVID-19?
  • How is COVID-19 treated?
  • How can I protect myself and others from COVID-19? 

For more information on how to stay safe visit LA County’s covid19.lacounty.gov.

COVID-19 & THE 2020 CENSUS

During this time of crisis, getting an accurate census count helps ensure the County of Los Angeles has the resources it needs to protect and support its local communities. When you are counted, you help increase funding for hospitals, health care services, child care centers, parks and affordable housing programs in LA County. 

If you haven’t already done so, take a few minutes to complete your census form online at www.my2020census.gov or by phone in any of the following languages:

English: 844-330-2020
Spanish: 844-468-2020
Chinese (Mandarin): 844-391-2020
Chinese (Cantonese): 844-398-2020
Vietnamese: 844-461-2020
Korean: 844-392-2020
Russian: 844-417-2020
Arabic: 844-416-2020
Tagalog: 844-478-2020
Polish: 844-479-2020
French: 844-494-2020
Haitian Creole: 844-477-2020
Portuguese: 844-474-2020
Japanese: 844-460-2020

Remember – your information remains confidential, and under federal law, can only be used to produce statistics.

(3/31/20)

LOS ANGELES COUNTY LAUNCHES BUSINESS & WORKER DISASTER HELP CENTER

INFORMATION FOR BUSINESSES

Coronavirus is impacting businesses throughout Los Angeles County. Learn how your business can obtain assistance during this health emergency. 

INFORMATION FOR WORKERS

The Los Angeles County Business & Worker Disaster Help Center is here to help workers affected by the coronavirus health emergency. Los Angeles County has gathered several useful resources to help Los Angeles County workers who may be experiencing adversities due to the global COVID-19 pandemic

Los Angeles County Business & Worker Disaster Help Center: CLICK HERE

(3/31/20)

IMPORTANT NOTICE FROM REPUBLIC SERVICES ABOUT RECYCLING AND WASTE SERVICE

Republic Services is closely monitoring the COVID-19 situation to make sure they’re doing the right thing for the health and safety of their employees, customers, and the communities they serve. Their number one priority is safety, and that is at the forefront of every decision they make.

Republic Services provide an essential service to the country, and like the police and fire departments, it’s their duty to help protect and serve the public, especially in times like these. While they are working hard to ensure the highest quality customer service and minimal service disruption, the recent surge in residential waste and unique challenges they face requires them to temporarily modify their service offerings to keep your community and Republic Services employees safe.

Beginning Monday, March 30, 2020, and until further notice, Republic Services will be operating under the following guidelines:

  • Only cart contents will be accepted. Drivers will not be authorized to leave their vehicle to pick- up waste outside of the cart.
  • Bulk and e-waste programs will be suspended temporarily.
  • Curbside recycling and yard waste collection services will remain in place. No other services will be impacted. However, they may need to use alternative disposal methods if there are disruptions to recycling processing capabilities or if recycling contamination increases. It’s important to keep waste out of your recycling container. 

The Republic Services team remains committed to you throughout this crisis and appreciates your business and wish you all the best during this difficult time. For updates, please visit RepublicServices.com

Download Republic Services Notice: ENGLISH  

(3/31/20)

SAN FERNANDO VALLEY RESCUE MISSION OPENS DRIVE-THRU FOOD PANTRY

Pick-ups, by appointment only, will be a the Northridge Fashion Center.

San Fernando Valley Rescue Mission are beyond grateful to be able to continue offering  shelter and mobile shower programs during the “shelter-at-home” order. However, they quickly realized that the community needed something more during the COVID-19 pandemic, as thousands of families in the Valley have been hit by job losses and are no longer able to purchase essential groceries.

And so the Mission, along with Harbor Recuperative Care, is responding to this crisis by mobilizing the community of local businesses, churches, government officials, and non-profit partners to provide free, drive-thru grocery distribution to those in need.

If you or anyone you know could benefit from this outreach, please visit the San Fernando Valley Rescue Mission’s online sign-up here. This web page also has links to other critical services available in the community along with ways to get involved in the effort to serve the community.

San Fernando Valley Rescue Mission believes that even in the midst of social distancing regulations that relationships can grow closer than ever to meet the need of the community.

Visit San Fernando Valley Rescue Mission’s Online Sign-up Portal: CLICK HERE

(3/31/20)

LOS ANGELES COUNTY URGES PUBLIC TO CONTINUE PRACTICING SOCIAL DISTANCING DURING WARM WEATHER

With warm weather forecasted for Los Angeles, the County of Los Angeles reminds residents that the Safer At Home directives are still in effect, and cautions against “behavioral fatigue” that may set in, especially when it is tempting to go outside. 

All L.A. County residents should continue to remain inside their homes unless it is absolutely necessary to leave in order to perform an essential function. Each time you leave your home, you are putting yourself and anyone near you at risk for contracting and spreading COVID-19.

Remaining indoors as the weather gets warmer in Los Angeles County can feel like a challenge. The following are some ways to keep busy and productive at home:

  • Find a furry friend: Foster a dog, cat or rabbit through Los Angeles County Animal Care and Control and save an orphaned animal.
  • Connect virtually with loved ones: There is no better time to call, text, or video chat loved ones to check in.
  • Use free online County resources for young children: If you are the parent or caregiver of a young child, decrease boredom and prevent the loss of preschool skills by clicking here to find resources and activities. The Los Angeles County Office of Education (LACOE) is also providing useful links and resources. Click here for more information.
  • Work on professional development: Teachers and other education professionals may take LACOE’s free online professional development courses
  • Do art activities at home: Visit Create at Home for free and fun resources to  engage your family members with the arts at home. 
  • Get organized: Organize your personal spaces like closets, home office/desk areas, cupboards, drawers, and vehicles.
  • Keep a routine: Take time to create and maintain a routine. Schedule time to eat, sleep, perform self-care rituals, pursue at-home hobbies, etc.  
  • Stay tuned in with yourself: Take time to monitor your mental and physical health every day. 

And last but not least, make a “crisis deal” with your family members. Take time to talk about what truly matters to each of you during the COVID-19 crisis, and clarify essential wants and needs. Set clear priorities for your family. When this kind of communication takes place, set kinds of principles are communicated, the practical day-to-day decisions that come later are easier. 

For more information and resources from the County of Los Angeles, please visit the County’s COVID-19 website.

(3/30/20)

LOS ANGELES COUNTY UPDATE ON MEDICAL SHELTERING & 211

MEDICAL SHELTERING UNDERWAY

LA County is standing up approximately 2,000 medical sheltering beds for LA County residents who either have been exposed to COVID-19 or who health authorities have determined need to self-isolate (or self-quarantine) but cannot do so in their own home. 

So far, LA County efforts include:

  • More than 900 medical sheltering beds now available for people in need;
  • More than 1,000 beds to be added by the end of the week;
  • At this time, medical sheltering has been set up at approximately eight locations, including the following locations: Dockweiler Beach; Martin Luther King, Jr. Recuperative Care Center; and, several hotels located throughout the County including in downtown Los Angeles, near Los Angeles International Airport, Lancaster, Pomona, Sherman Oaks and Van Nuys 

If you are a hotel or motel operator interested in partnering with the County, and are willing to provide your facility as a COVID-19 medical shelter, please visit doingbusiness.lacounty.gov. We have created this website to quickly identify and engage interested hotel/motel operators in the COVID-19 response. 

211

211 LA County is a team of devoted community resource experts committed to providing LA County residents with accurate, timely, and trusted information on the COVID-19 health crisis. Before making that 211 call, we want to help you save time with this quick guide on the Do’s and Don’ts of 211 LA County:

211 can help with…

  • Information on COVID-19: symptoms, spread, disinfecting
  • Questions about the “Safer At Home” Health Order
  • Guidance for Employers, Businesses, Workers, Medical Professionals, and
    Service Provider
  • Referrals to sign up for health insurance or find a clinic if you don’t already have a
    medical provider
  • Referrals to food pantries, food distribution sites/programs, or CalFresh food benefits if you are struggling financially to purchase food
  • Shelter referrals, motel vouchers for homeless families only, and eviction
    moratorium inform
  • Information on County services
  • Referrals to health, human, and social services and supports – please note service
    hours and delivery is changing
  • Reporting an act of hate or bullying motivated by country of origin, race, religion,
    gender, sexual orientation 

211 cannot help with…

  • Requesting a COVID-19 test or testing kit
  • Requesting an exemption from the Safer at Home Health Order
  • Requesting or ordering masks, sanitation supplies or medical supplies, or accepting donations of these supplies
  • Screening/testing for COVID-19 symptoms or admission to a clinic, hospital, or
    quarantine center (contact your doctor, medical or clinic provider)
  • Locations to purchase groceries or meals (grocery stores are restocking, and many
    restaurants are open for pick up or delivery)
  • Booking hotel rooms at the Fairplex or any other hotel/quarantine housing
    locations
  • Direct connection to County officials or Department of Public Health
  • Lists of services and providers 
  • Filing a police report, or reporting a dispute or crime not motivated by discrimination of a protected class 

Of course, you can also visit 211la.org to learn more about how 211 LA County can help.

(3/30/20)

SAN FERNANDO WATER SUPPLY AND SERVICE

San Fernando water comes from wells that pump water from in the ground. It is treated and is delivered ready for drinking, washing, and bathing and will meet your needs during these challenging times. You have enough to worry about right now, don’t worry about San Fernando water; we will continue to deliver water that exceeds the health standards. We do not expect disruptions to our customers due to COVID-19.

Additionally, the City of San Fernando WILL NOT be disconnecting any customers’ water and WILL BE waiving all late fees due to limited access to City Hall. If your water bill is due, currently, there are three payment options: 

  • By Mail: City of San Fernando, 117 Macneil Street, San Fernando, CA 91340
  • Night Dropbox: Located outside City Hall’s main entrance on the right-hand side. Place your payment in an envelope and put it in the drop box. NO CASH PLEASE. Payments received in the drop-box will be processed by 9:00 am the next business day.
  • AutoPay: Available to all City of San Fernando water customers. It is a direct debit program that works with your bank for a quick and simple way to pay your utility bill electronically. Click here to download an AutoPay Application

Please contact the Finance Department (Finance@sfcity.org or (818) 898-1212) to set up alternate payment plans. 

 

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

(3/27/20)

LOS ANGELES COUNTY LAUNCHES NEW INTERACTIVE DIGITAL DASHBOARDS, CONNECTING RESIDENTS TO LATEST UPDATES ON COVID-19 IMPACTS

Los Angeles County launched several new digital tools today to help residents access up-to-date information about the COVID-19 pandemic. A suite of new interactive maps and dashboards are now live on the County website, providing—in one place—a digital hub for updates about virus case counts, emergency proclamations, and information regarding openings and closures for parks, recreation sites, and schools throughout Los Angeles County. 

The new dashboards track, analyze, and display multiple data sources. They are the result of collaboration between the County’s Department of Public Health, Health Services, Parks and Recreation, the Los Angeles County Office of Education, and the Office of Emergency Management. Though the focus is local, the new interactive sites also incorporate global data from Johns Hopkins University’s COVID-19 tracking map.

“These maps and dashboards are the latest step we have taken to keep the people of Los Angeles County informed during the COVID-19 pandemic, and connected to County services,” stated Kevin McGowan, Director of the Los Angeles County Office of Emergency Management. “The amount of information about the virus online can be overwhelming, and the data and updates change minute-to-minute. Our COVID-19 website, and its features including these new interactive tools, are a centralized source of trusted information.” 

Four new dashboards are now available (covid19.lacounty.gov/dashboards): 

  • Case Count Dashboard: This map tracks and displays local Los Angeles County COVID-19 cases and deaths. The interactive dashboard allows users to click on a city or community name, zoom to the selected area, and view the total case count for that community, as well as adjacent areas. The dashboard is updated daily with case count data from the Department of Public Health. 
  • Emergency Proclamations Dashboard: This interactive dashboard displays local emergency proclamations throughout Los Angeles County.  Users can click a city name to see when a local emergency was proclaimed and view the official proclamation. The dashboard links to cities’ official websites and is updated as LA County’s 88 cities make proclamations.
  • Parks and Recreation Closures: This dashboard shows the status of recreation activities, senior programs, and other services provided by County Parks and Recreation.  Users can click to find out which services are open, partially closed, or completely closed. The dashboard is updated as services change throughout the County.
  • School Closures: This dashboard displays the closure status of the 80 school districts supported by the Los Angeles County Office of Education (LACOE). Users can click a district to view schools and enrollment count. It is updated with information from LACOE.   

These new dashboards are built on an Esri ArcGIs platform, and are additionally accessible through a mobile version. They are located in the County COVID-19 site’s Newsroom section, which also contains videos, photos, links to Incident Reports, and daily summaries created by the Los Angeles County Emergency Operations Center.  

 

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

(3/27/20)

LOS ANGELES COUNTY HEALTH OFFICER ISSUES NEW ORDERS DIRECTING SELF-QUARANTINE AND SELF ISOLATION

On March 25, 2020, in an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19, protect vulnerable individuals, and prevent the Los Angeles County healthcare system from being overwhelmed, the LA County Health Officer has issued two new separate orders:

  • Self-quarantine of anyone exposed to an individual diagnosed with or likely to have COVID-19.
  • Self-isolation of anyone diagnosed with or showing symptoms consistent with COVID-19 within 14 days of being in close contact with a person who had or was believed to have COVID-19. 

These new Orders ensure that individuals who test positive for COVID-19, and those who are told by a clinician they are presumed to be positive for COVID-19 are required to self-isolate for a period of at least 3 days without symptoms, including being fever free without taking medicine, and 7 days since symptoms started, whichever is longer.  Additionally, those who have been in close contact with someone who is positive or presumed positive must quarantine themselves for 14 days from the last time they had contact with the ill person.

“It is critically important that everyone adheres to all the social distancing measures and practice good public health hygiene, including washing hands as frequently as possible,” said Dr. Barbara Ferrer, Director of the L.A. County Department of Public Health. “Individuals covered by these Orders should still contact their providers to get advice if they feel their symptoms are worsening.”

There are key differences between self-quarantine and self-isolation. Here’s what the new orders mean for you:  

SELF-QUARANTINE ORDER

(EXPOSED)

  • Required for anyone exposed to a person diagnosed with or likely to have COVID-19.
  • You must stay in quarantine for 14 days from the last time you had contact with the ill person.
  • You cannot leave your place of quarantine for all 14 days.
  • Only exception to leave quarantine is to receive medical care.
  • If you develop even mild COVID-19 symptoms, you must self-isolate at home and away from others. 

SELF-ISOLATION ORDER

(DIAGNOSED)

  • Required for anyone diagnosed with or showing symptoms consistent with COVID-19 within 14 days of being in close contact with a person who had or was believed to have COVID-19.
  • Self-isolation period must last at least 3 days without symptoms, including being fever free without taking medicine, and 7 days since symptoms started, whichever is longer.
  • Notify anyone you’ve had close contact with while symptomatic to self-quarantine themselves.    
     

Further information on steps to take to self-quarantine can be found here in English and here in Spanish, as well as further information on steps to take to self-isolate can be found here in English and here in Spanish.

Los Angeles County is relying on its residents to respect and follow these health orders without enforcement by peace officers out of caution for their own health and safety and that of the greater community. Residents’ cooperation with the health orders is critical as we work to flatten the curve and move beyond the pandemic. We’re in this together. 

 

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

(3/26/20)

SENIOR CARE

The County of Los Angeles continues to offer its older adult population with critically-needed services. It is important to know:

MEALS

  • Meal sites operated by the County of Los Angeles and the City of Los Angeles are in the midst of transitioning all meal operations to home delivered meals.
  • For details on the status of your location, visit: http://bit.ly/mealsites 
  • Older adults may also contact their local meal provider to make arrangements. Call 1-800-510-2020 for assistance. 

MEDICAL CARE

  • Today, L.A. County’s Department of Health also issued the following guidance to older adults, in light of increased COVID-19 spread:
  • If you have underlying health conditions you should consider contacting your providers earlier when you are sick. 

MENTAL HEALTH

Older adults may experience stress more acutely during this time. Know the signs:

  • Fear and worry about personal health and the health of loved ones
  • Changes in sleep or eating patterns
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Worsening of chronic health problems
  • Increased use of alcohol, tobacco or other drugs   

If you are an older adult feeling overwhelmed, there is support available 24/7. Call the Department of Mental Health at 1-800-854-7771 or visit their website for Coronavirus/COVID19 Mental Health Resources 

(3/26/20)

SUPPORT LOCAL BUSINESS

The City of San Fernando is very supportive of small business and is promoting a #ShopLocalSanFernando program through the City’s website and social media outlets. If your business has a program you would like to promote, please email the information to CityManager@sfcity.org for consideration. 

During the week of March 16, 2020, the City distributed a survey to local restaurants to help create a directory for San Fernando residents to gain access to food services. As of March 26, 2020, the directory has grown to approximately 40 restaurants. The directory will be updated periodically as it grows. If you are a restaurant in the City of San Fernando or the immediate surrounding area, there’s still an opportunity to complete the survey; see the link below.

Download the San Fernando Restaurant Directory: ENGLISH

Complete the San Fernando Restaurant Survey: ENGLISH 

 

METROLINK TEMPORARY SERVICE REDUCTION (EFFECTIVE 3/26/20)

Safety is foundational at Metrolink and they have taken numerous steps to guard the safety of passengers, employees, contractors and customers as they continue to adjust to the world around us in response to COVID-19. Metrolink immediately increased cleaning and disinfecting practices onboard trains – including cleaning and wiping down surfaces such as doors, restrooms and passenger areas.

Metrolink understands the unique role they play in providing lifeline transportation services during times of need and have been taking care of the people who take care of people – including their own essential employees and will continue to do so. As communities began issuing Stay at Home orders, ridership has decreased significantly. As of Friday, March 20, Metrolink ridership demand was down 81% compared to the same day a year ago, with 7,139 riders using our system compared to 37,004 on March 20, 2019. In response to this, Metrolink has made the determination that it is time to temporarily reduce service beginning Thursday, March 26, 2020. Rider notification began on March 24, 2020.

This decision was not taken lightly, as Metrolink is proud to provide vital transportation services to essential employees throughout Southern California. Their planned temporary 30% service reduction preserves the peak-hour service where they see the greatest proportion of remaining ridership, while avoiding the possibility of creating crowding situations on trains. Metrolink looked carefully at ridership on every line to ensure they allowed for enough service so riders can spread out and maintain the social distancing guidelines everyone is observing. For instance, the average load factor for the trains that will be annulled is 2.33%.

Thank you for your continued support during these unprecedented times. For updates, you may visit the Metrolink website. Another easy way to get to that page on a mobile device is by texting “ML19” to “333777”.  

 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY ALERTS PUBLIC ABOUT INCREASING COVID-19 SCAMS, FRAUDULENT WEBSITES, EMAILS AND DONATION REQUESTS

Los Angeles County, including the City of San Fernando, residents are reminded of several fraud schemes designed to prey on the vulnerable in the midst of the COVID-19 public health crisis. Reports of malicious websites, email schemes, and suspicious links have come to the attention of law enforcement and public officials.

“Malicious actors can prey upon those that are distracted by the COVID-19 pandemic, and use it to their advantage,” stated Los Angeles County Chief Information Officer William Kehoe. “The public needs to be mindful and careful, and avoid websites, phishing emails, and scams that engage people through false information about the health crisis, and steal personal user information and data. By clicking on fraudulent weblinks, hackers can deliver malware and then gain access to passwords, browsing information, credit card numbers, and other personal information. We all need to stay vigilant.”

Currently, there are several Coronavirus tracking and mapping sites that are actually malware websites. Instead of clicking on these links, cybersecurity experts advise that website users should instead hover over the link to verify the uniform resource locator (URL) before moving forward. Online hackers may also send users emails from fraudulent accounts impersonating official websites and doctors, or offering medical supplies and services.

A trusted COVID-19 mapping resource is the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Global Map, which can be found at coronavirus.jhu.edu. Additionally, there are several websites the County of Los Angeles recommends for accurate, up-to-date information on COVID-19. The following is a list of sites:

As residents in Los Angeles County, including the City of San Fernando, practice “Safer at Home” directives, they are spending more time at home and online. Scammers are also taking advantage of this change in circumstances by reaching out door-to-door asking for donations and fundraising contributions through cash, Bitcoin, or Paypal. The County of Los Angeles reminds residents that they are not required to open their door, and encourages everyone to not feel intimidated by a false sense of urgency to answer door-to-door solicitations.

The following is a list of safety tips the public can follow:

  • Avoid online advertising offers related to COVID-19
  • Decline door-to-door solicitations claiming COVID-19 fundraising
  • Do not click on emails and attachments that you do not recognize
  • Visit trusted websites for COVID-19 related information 

Everyone should remain vigilant and take these steps to avoid being victimized by malicious scammers trying to profit from the COVID-19 crisis. If you believe you have been scammed, contact your bank immediately and report the information to local law enforcement.   

 

GREATER LOS ANGELES COUNTY VECTOR CONTROL DISTRICT (GLACVCD) IN RESPONSE TO COVID-19

Protecting the health of GLACVCD employees and the community we serve is a top priority. The GLACVCD is committed to helping slow the spread of COVID-19 and is modifying its services and staff schedule in accordance with the CDC and local public health recommendations. At this time, both District offices in Santa Fe Springs and Sylmar are temporarily closed to the public and all residential requests for service are suspended.

Although GLACVCD facilities are closed, they remain committed to protecting public health and will continue to operate mission-critical programs to ensure the threat of mosquito-borne viruses is controlled. Depending on weather conditions, staff will continue to conduct surveillance as well as inspect and treat accessible large and chronic mosquito breeding sources such as gutters, flood control channels, and parks. GLACVCD will also continue to operate outreach and educational programs remotely.

Residents experiencing issues with mosquitoes should visit the GLACVCD website or DIY resource page to learn how they can prevent mosquito breeding on their property.

Download the GLACVCD FAQ Sheet: ENGLISH  

 

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

(3/24/20)

CITY OF SAN FERNANDO SENIOR MEALS PROGRAM

Effective March 31, 2020, the City of San Fernando’s Senior Meals Program contractor, YWCA San Gabriel Valley will no longer be distributing meals from Las Palmas Park. All program participants were informed that, to protect their well-being, all meals will be delivered directly to their home. Seniors that are interested in receiving meals may contact YWCA San Gabriel Valley at (626) 214-9456.

Download YWCA San Gabriel Valley Memo: ENGLISH/SPANISH  

Download Senior Meals Application:  ENGLISH    

 

STAY INFORMED!

The City of San Fernando wants the community to stay well-informed, please consider subscribing to our distribution lists: WWW.SFCITY.ORG/e-notification/

You may also sign-up to receive public safety alerts:

  • From your mobile device, text your Zip Code to 888777 to opt-in; or
  • From your desktop computer, visit our home page, scroll down to the “Recent Messages from San Fernando Police Department” section, and click “Sign Up!” 
  • Call or email us, we’ll be happy to add you to add you to the list: (818) 898-1202; Info@sfcity.org   
     

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

(3/24/20)

COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES OFFICE OF IMMIGRANT AFFAIRS DISTRIBUTES FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FOR IMMIGRANTS

Immigrants in Los Angeles County, like everyone, are worried about the coronavirus outbreak. Moreover, some immigrants are afraid that getting tested or treated will affect their immigration status. Click on the Frequently Asked Questions link below for answers to common questions. You should seek available testing and treatment, regardless of your immigration status.

Download County of Los Angeles Office of Immigrant Affairs FAQ:  ENGLISH | SPANISH     

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

(3/23/20)

CITY OF SAN FERNANDO ANNOUNCES TEMPORARY SUSPENSION OF LOCAL TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING METER FEES TO SUPPORT THE COMMUNITY

Due to the evolving efforts to curtail the spread of the Coronavirus, including the “Stay at Home” order issued by the state of California and the “Safer at Home” order issued by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, the City of San Fernando will take additional actions to support critical functions in the community.  Effective Monday, March 23, 2020:

  • Ridership on the Mission City Transit Line (Trolley) will be limited to fifty-percent (50%) of occupancy to support social distancing for passengers.
  • The Mission City Transit and Dial-a-Ride programs will be free of charge until further notice.
  • On-street parking meter fees are suspended until further notice. Time restrictions at on-street parking meters will remain in effect to encourage convenient drive-up and curbside pickup at commercial locations. 

The relaxed residential street sweeping restrictions that went into effect on March 19, 2020 remain in effect.  As a reminder, the 2-hour street sweeping parking restriction in the residential areas have been relaxed to allow street parking as soon as the street sweeper has gone through the area.

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

(3/21/20)

COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUES REVISED SAFER AT HOME ORDER FOR CONTROL OF COVID-19

Download County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health Safer at Home Order (3/21/20): ENGLISH

Download County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health Safer At Home FAQ: ENGLISH  

The public and private sectors must help to prevent the spread of COVID-19 by practicing social distancing and taking common-sense infection control precautions. Due to the continued rapid spread of COVID-19 and the need to protect the most vulnerable members of our community, the County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health has called upon everyone to stay at home or in their place of residence, except when they need to work at an Essential Business or Healthcare Operation, provide Essential Infrastructure, shop at an Essential Business, or engage in an Essential Activity.

 

FOR MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC, WHAT THIS MEANS IS THAT THEY SHOULD:

  • Stay home (stay unexposed and do not expose others)
  • Only go out for essential services or if they are an essential worker
  • Stay six feet or more away from others
  • Not gather in groups 

 

THE ORDER, WHICH IS IN EFFECT UNTIL APRIL 19, 2020, SPECIFICALLY:

  • Prohibits all indoor and outdoor public and private gatherings and events among persons not in the same household in Los Angeles County.
  • Requires all businesses to stop in-person operations and close to the public, unless the business is defined as an Essential Business. It specifically requires all indoor malls and shopping centers, all swap meets and flea markets, all indoor and outdoor playgrounds, and all non-essential businesses to close.
  • Requires Essential Businesses that are not required to close to the public to practice social distancing to the extent possible and infection control precautions listed in the Order.
  • Requires all restaurants to only prepare and offer food that is provided to customers via delivery service, via pick-up for takeout dining, and via drive-thru. Restaurants may not provide indoor or outdoor table service.

This Order doesn’t prevent any individual or family from engaging in passive recreational or outdoor activities, such as hiking, walking, jogging, or biking, so long as all persons practice social distancing to the extent possible.

Because the Order may be updated or extended, all residents should consult the County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health’s website  daily until the Order is ended, and follow any updated requirements.

 

CLICK HERE FOR ADDITIONAL FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS RELATED TO THE 3/21/20 SAFER AT HOME ORDER

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

Safer at Home(3/19/20)

COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUES SAFER AT HOME ORDER FOR CONTROL OF COVID-19

Download County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health Safer at Home Order: ENGLISH

To further combat the spread of COVID-19, the County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health has issued a “Safer at Home” Order – ordering all residents in the County of Los Angeles, including the City of San Fernando, to stay inside their residences, and immediately limit all movement outside of their homes beyond what is absolutely necessary to take care of essential needs.

THE BOTTOM LINE

Residents of the City of San Fernando are required to stay inside their homes unless they are engaged in certain “essential activities.” On those occasions when you are out of your home for necessary tasks, stay at least six feet away from others

YOU CAN

  • Go to the grocery, convenience or warehouse store
  • Go to the pharmacy to pick up medications and other healthcare necessities
  • Go to medical appointments (check with your doctor or provider first)
  • Go to a restaurant for take-out, delivery or drive-thru
  • Care or support a friend or family member
  • Take a walk, ride your bike, hike, jog and be in nature for exercise — just keep at least six feet between you and others in the community. 
  • Walk your pets and take them to the veterinarian if necessary
  • Help someone to get necessary supplies 

YOU SHOULD NOT

  • Go to work unless you are providing essential services as defined by this Order
  • Visit friends and family if there is no urgent need
  • Maintain less than 6 feet of distance from others when you go out
  • Visit loved ones in the hospital, nursing home, skilled nursing facility, or other residential care facility 

IS THIS ORDER MANDATORY? WHAT HAPPENS IF I DON’T COMPLY?

Yes. This is a legally enforceable order. It is against the law to violate this Order, and you may be punished by a fine or imprisonment for doing so. 

 

CLICK HERE FOR ADDITIONAL FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

(3/18/20; 12:56 pm)

CITY OF SAN FERNANDO ANNOUNCES SLIGHT CHANGES TO RESIDENTIAL STREET SWEEPING PARKING RESTRICTIONS

Street sweeping in residential and commercial areas is a critical component for maintaining public hygiene, removing trash, keeping the City’s storm drains clear of debris to avoid flooding, and reducing standing water.  During this state of emergency, where public hygiene and cleanliness is of paramount importance, the City must continue to maintain regularly scheduled street sweeping services to protect public health. 

However, the City recognizes that the closure of schools, businesses, and the statewide directive to practice social distancing has resulted in more vehicles in our residential neighborhoods than usual.  Therefore, effective Thursday, March 19, 2020, the City will relax the current 2-hour street sweeping parking restriction in the residential areas to allow street parking as soon as the street sweeper has gone through the area.  Vehicles parked in a restricted area that block the street sweeper’s ability to clean a particular area will continue to be subject to a fine.  

To reiterate, residents may move their vehicle and park on the restricted portion of the street after the sweeper has passed along the curb and cleaned the street. Please be sure the sweeper has cleaned the street before parking in the restricted parking zone.  All other parking restrictions, including street sweeping parking restrictions in the commercial corridors, will remain in effect.  

 

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

(3/18/20)

COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES PRESS RELEASE: DISASTER ASSISTANCE LOANS NOW AVAILABLE TO LOS ANGELES COUNTY SMALL BUSINESSES ECONOMICALLY IMPACTED BY THE CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19)

Download County of Los Angeles Press Release: ENGLISH  

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is offering low-interest federal disaster loans for working capital to California small businesses suffering substantial economic injury as a result of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

Director of the Los Angeles County Office of Emergency Management. “The devastating economic impact of COVID-19 is palpable. There is a great need for economic support during the coronavirus disaster, and SBA federal disaster loans are an excellent resource for small business owners.”

Applicants may apply online, receive additional disaster assistance information and download applications at disasterloan.sba.gov/ela . Applicants may also call SBA’s Customer Service Center at (800) 659-2955 or email disastercustomerservice@sba.gov for more information on SBA disaster assistance. Individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing may call (800) 877-8339. Completed applications should be mailed to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155. The deadline to apply for an Economic Injury Disaster Loan is December 16, 2020.

For more information about Coronavirus, visit: publichealth.lacounty.gov/media/Coronavirus/.
For more information about available SBA resources and services, visit: SBA.gov/coronavirus. 

 

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

(3/17/20; 5 pm)

WATER SUPPLY AND SERVICE

San Fernando water comes from wells that pump water from in the ground. It is treated and is delivered ready for drinking, washing, and bathing and will meet your needs during these challenging times. You have enough to worry about right now, don’t worry about San Fernando water; we will continue to deliver water that exceeds the health standards. We do not expect disruptions to our customers due to COVID-19.

Additionally, the City of San Fernando will not be disconnecting any customers’ water and will be waiving all late fees due to limited access to City Hall. Please contact the Finance Department (Finance@sfcity.org or (818) 898-1212) to set up alternate payment plans.  

Download California Water Boards Drinking Water FAQ  

 

PARKING RESTRICTIONS

Currently, the City of San Fernando has not relaxed any parking restrictions; however, the policy is being reviewed and more information will be available in the coming days. Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.  

 

STAY INFORMED!

The City of San Fernando wants the community to stay well-informed, please consider subscribing to our distribution lists: WWW.SFCITY.ORG/e-notification/

You may also sign-up to receive public safety alerts:

  • From your mobile device, text your Zip Code to 888777 to opt-in; or
  • From your desktop computer, visit our home page, scroll down to the “Recent Messages from San Fernando Police Department” section, and click “Sign Up!” 
  • Call or email us, we’ll be happy to add you to add you to the list: (818) 898-1202; Info@sfcity.org   
     

SUPPORT LOCAL BUSINESSES

The San Fernando City Council is very supportive of small business and will be taking a number of steps to assist during this time.  The City will also be promoting a shop local program through the City’s website and social media outlets.  If your business has a program you would like to promote, please email the information to CityManager@sfcity.org for consideration.

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

(3/17/20; 12 pm)

At their March 16, 2020 regular meeting, the City Council declared a local emergency due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Additionally, the County of Los Angeles issued an order, which applies to the City of San Fernando.

Download County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health – Health Officer Order for the Control of COVID-19: ENGLISH

Download Notice to Businesses in the City of San Fernando: ENGLISH | SPANISH

Accordingly, the City is distributing the below notice to businesses located in the City of San Fernando.

NOTICE TO BUSINESSES IN THE CITY OF SAN FERNANDO RE: CLOSURE OF CERTAIN BUSINESSES, PROHIBITION OF GROUP EVENTS AND GATHERINGS, AND REQUIRED SOCIAL DISTANCING MEASURE

The County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health has issued a Health Officer Order for the Control of Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) and is ordering significant protective measures to slow the spread within the Greater Los Angeles community, including the City of San Fernando, effective March 16, 2020 through March 31, 2020 (HOA.102820213.1).

  • PROHIBITED GATHERINGS: All indoor/outdoor, public and private gatherings within a confined space (e.g., banquet halls), where at least 50 people are expected to be in attendance at the same time.
  • ALL OTHER GATHERINGS WITH LESS THAN 50 PEOPLE: Must practice (1) Social Distancing, requiring attendees to be separated by 6 feet; (2) provide access to hand washing with soap and water or hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol; (3) post a sign at the public entry instructing members of the public to not attend if they are experiencing symptoms (respiratory illness, fever, cough); and (f) adhere to communicable disease control recommendations provided by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.
  • RESTAURANTS (PERMANENT FOOD FACILITIES, INCLUDING BARS AND NIGHTCLUBS): Must limit services to only preparing and offering food to customers via delivery service, pick-up for take-out dining, or drive thru only. NO DINE IN CUSTOMERS ALLOWED.
  • BUSINESSES ORDERED TO CLOSE: Bars and Nightclubs, Gyms and Fitness Centers, Movie Theaters, Live Performance Theaters, Bowling Alleys, and Arcades. 

The City of San Fernando understands this will be a hardship for many businesses and their employees.  These steps are necessary to minimize the long-term impacts to public health and the economy.  The San Fernando City Council is very supportive of small business and will be taking a number of steps to assist during this time.  The City will not be shutting off access to water and will waive late fees.  If you have trouble making water, business license, or other City payments, please contact the Finance Department (Finance@sfcity.org or (818) 898-1212) to work out an interest-free payment plan.  The City will also be promoting a shop local program through the City’s website and social media outlets.  If your business has a program you would like to promote, please email the information to CityManager@sfcity.org for consideration.

 For additional information visit any of the following websites:

Los Angeles County Department of Public Health www.publichealth.lacounty.gov/media/coronavirus/

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

(3/17/20; 9 am)

CITY OF SAN FERNANDO ANNOUNCES CITY HALL FULL CLOSURE TO PUBLIC ACCESS

In an effort to limit the potential exposure and spread of  novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and to safeguard the City of San Fernando’s ability to continue providing essential services, including public safety, water service, and community support, effective immediately, City Hall will be closed to the public.

City staff will continue to be available to answer calls and respond to emails Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. through 5:30 p.m., and Friday, 8:00 a.m. through 5:00 p.m. For additional convenience, the public can use the Online Permit Counter, www.sfcity.org/Community-Development, to submit building permit applications, track progress, and schedule inspections online. Customers are also asked to mail in payments or sign-up for Autopay to avoid the need to come to City Hall.

Additionally, the City of San Fernando will not be disconnecting any customers’ water and will be waiving all late fees due to limited access to City Hall. Please contact the Finance Department (Finance@sfcity.org or (818) 898-1212) to set up alternate payment plans.

City Manager’s Office (818) 898-1202 CityManager@sfcity.org
City Clerk (818) 898-1204 CityClerk@sfcity.org
Community Development (818) 898-1227 CommunityDevelopment@sfcity.org
Finance (818) 898-1212 Finance@sfcity.org
Personnel (818) 898-1220 Personnel@sfcity.org
Police (818) 898-1267 Police@sfcity.org
Public Works (818) 898-1222 PublicWorks@sfcity.org
Recreation & Community Services (818) 898-1290 Recreation@sfcity.org

The City continues to take steps to protect the health of employees and the public by placing disinfectant wipes at all public counters and conference areas, mandating social distancing during in-person meetings, and providing large informational posters throughout City facilities that provide information on COVID-19 related to how the virus is spread, primary symptoms, and how to protect yourself.

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

(3/16/20; 11:50 am)

NOTICE OF AGENDA ITEM TO DISCUSS DECLARATION OF LOCAL EMERGENCY, CLOSING BARS, NIGHTCLUBS, GYMS AND ENTERTAINMENT VENUES, AND LIMITING DINE-IN RESTAURANTS

Please be advised that the San Fernando City Council will be considering a walk-on item at tonight’s regular City Council meeting to declare a local emergency as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.  In addition to discussing actions the City has taken to date, the City Council may also discuss taking further action, including, but not limited to, ordering bars, nightclubs, gyms and other entertainment venues to close for a period of time and limiting dine-in eating at local restaurants.

The regular City Council meeting will be held tonight at 6:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers at San Fernando City Hall, 117 Macneil Street, San Fernando, CA 91340.  In accordance with the Governor’s Executive Order N-25-20, members of the public may participate in the meeting via teleconference or view the meeting on Facebook Live @TheCityOfSanFernando. The teleconference call-in number is: (866) 783-7151; participant pass code 5409878.  Public comments on agenda items may also be emailed to CityClerk@sfcity.org.

For more information regarding City Council meetings, call or email the City Manager’s Office at (818) 898-1202 or CityManager@sfcity.org

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

(3/13/20)

LOS ANGELES COUNTY ANNOUNCES TEMPORARY LIBRARY CLOSURES

On March 13, 2020, Los Angeles County announced the planned temporary closure of all 86 library locations to the public, effective March 14, 2020.  

Download Memorandum from Los Angeles County Library: ENGLISH  

(3/13/20)

SENIOR MEAL PROGRAM TEMPORARILY CHANGES

On March 12, 2020, YWCA San Gabriel Valley advised the City of San Fernando that they would be temporarily changing the senior meal program and limiting the time program participants spend congregating. At the direction of Los Angeles County and effective March 17, 2020, YWCA San Gabriel Valley will distribute two box lunches and if possible three frozen meals for seniors to take and enjoy at home. Meals will be provided once each week, on Tuesday, at Las Palmas Park until further direction is provided by Los Angeles County. 

Download Memorandum from YWCA San Gabriel Valley: ENGLISH | SPANISH

(3/13/20; 3:10 pm)

CITY OF SAN FERNANDO ANNOUNCES LIMITED CITY FACILITY HOURS AND SERVICES

In an effort to limit the potential exposure and spread of  novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and to safeguard the City of San Fernando’s ability to continue providing essential services, including public safety, water service, and community support, public access to City facilities will be temporarily limited.

SAN FERNANDO CITY HALL: Beginning Monday, March 16, 2020, San Fernando City Hall will be limiting open hours to the public to Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays from noon through 5:30 p.m.

These limited City Hall hours will remain in effect until further notice.  During the limited open hours, the public will be able to enter City Hall to complete the 2020 Census at the Questionnaire Action Kiosk (QAK), apply for permits, make payments and conduct other City business.

We strongly encourage the public to conduct business with City Hall via telephone and email until further notice.

City Manager’s Office (818) 898-1202 CityManager@sfcity.org
City Clerk (818) 898-1204 CityClerk@sfcity.org
Community Development (818) 898-1227 CommunityDevelopment@sfcity.org
Finance (818) 898-1212 Finance@sfcity.org
Personnel (818) 898-1220 Personnel@sfcity.org
Police (818) 898-1267 Police@sfcity.org
Public Works (818) 898-1222 PublicWorks@sfcity.org
Recreation & Community Services (818) 898-1290 Recreation@sfcity.org

City staff will continue to be available to answer calls and respond to emails Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. through 5:30 p.m., and Friday, 8:00 a.m. through 5:00 p.m. For additional convenience, the public can use the Online Permit Counter, www.sfcity.org/Community-Development, to submit building permit applications, track progress, and schedule inspections online. Customers are also asked to mail in payments or sign-up for Autopay to avoid the need to come to City Hall.

CITY COUNCIL MEETINGS: In addition to the limited City Hall hours, members of the public may participate in City Council meetings via teleconference, in accordance with the Governor’s Executive Order N-25-20. The teleconference call-in number is: (866) 783-7151; participant pass code 5409878. In addition, the City Council meeting scheduled for March 16, 2020 will be viewable on Facebook Live @TheCityOfSanFernando; public comments on agenda items may also be emailed to CityClerk@sfcity.org. City Council meetings are regularly scheduled for the 1st and 3rd Mondays of each month. For more information regarding City Council meetings, call or email the City Manager’s Office at (818) 898-1202 or CityManager@sfcity.org.

SAN FERNANDO POLICE DEPARTMENT: The San Fernando Police Department’s counter hours will remain the same (Records Bureau, Monday through Friday, 8:30 am to 5:30 pm; Detective Bureau, Monday through Friday, 8:30 am to 5 pm); however, Live Scan, Court Commitment, and Vehicle Inspection services will be suspended until further notice. For more information regarding public safety services (non-emergency), call the Police Department at (818) 898-1267 or Police@sfcity.org.

RECREATION FACILITIES: Effective immediately, both recreational facilities (Las Palmas Park, located at 505 S. Huntington St., San Fernando; and Recreation Park, located at 208 Park Ave., San Fernando) are closed to the public and all senior, recreation, and community programs have been suspended until further notice. For more information on recreation programming, please contact the Recreation and Community Services Department at (818) 898-1290 or Recreation@sfcity.org.

The City has also taken steps to protect the health of employees and the public by placing disinfectant wipes at all public counters and conference areas, mandating social distancing during in-person meetings, and providing large informational posters throughout City facilities that provide information on COVID-19 related to how the virus is spread, primary symptoms, and how to protect yourself.

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

(3/13/20; 10:38 am)

THE CITY OF SAN FERNANDO SUSPENDS SENIOR, RECREATION AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

Effective immediately, the City of San Fernando is suspending senior, recreation, and community programs as a precautionary measure to protect residents, especially the more vulnerable senior population, from further spread of COVID-19, commonly known as novel coronavirus.

The programs below are suspended at least through April 3, 2020:

  • Neighborhood and Business Watch meetings.
  • Tree planting events on March 14, 2020 and March 28, 2020.
  • All adult and youth sports, including soccer, basketball, softball, and baseball (games may be rescheduled to the end of the season).
  • Open gym.
  • National Junior Tennis Program Tennis.
  • Senior club dances (refunds available) and general membership meetings.
  • Facility rentals (refunds available).
  • All other fitness, exercise, art, cultural art, and youth programs.

Please call (818) 898-1290 check the availability or status of any City facility or program.

The decision to suspend these programs comes in response to a health advisory issued by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) earlier this week recommending organizations across the state consider cancelling all non-essential large gatherings of more than 250 people, smaller gatherings that do not allow social distancing of six feet per person, and gatherings of individuals who are at higher risk of severe illness, such as seniors and those with pre-existing health conditions.

According to the CDPH, “the timely implementation of aggressive strategies that create social distance and reduce close contact of people not regularly together, including limiting gatherings, has proven effective in prior pandemics at delaying rates of transmission and reducing illness and death.”

The City encourages residents to take the following steps to keep themselves and their family healthy:

  • Wash your hands frequently with soap and water for 20 seconds.
  • Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer (but handwashing is better).
  • When coughing/sneezing, cover your mouth with your sleeve or a tissue and throw the tissue away immediately.
  • Clean doorknobs and frequently touched surfaces.
  • Practice social distancing (masks are limited value unless you are sick or a health worker). Limit close contact and avoid other social norms, such as shaking hands, hugs and other close contact in the foreseeable future. Elbow bumps are a good alternative.
  • Have provisions that will last a few days (water, food, essential hygiene supplies, etc.).
  • Get immunized against the flu. This will relieve what could be a highly impacted healthcare system.
  • Stay home when you’re sick. Don’t wait until you are VERY sick. 

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

WHAT IS CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19)?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Many of them infect animals, but some coronaviruses from animals can evolve (change) into a new human coronavirus that can spread from person-to-person. This is what happened with the current novel (new) coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. Diseases from corona viruses in people typically cause mild to moderate illness, like the common cold. Some, like the SARS or MERS viruses, cause serious infections like pneumonia.
 

Download Los Angeles County Department of Public Health’s Frequently Asked Questions ENGLISH | SPANISH

HOW IS IT SPREAD?

airplane People who have traveled to or from Wuhan, China since December 1, 2019, could have been exposed to the virus. Seek medical care if you traveled to Wuhan and develop a fever and cough or respiratory symptoms within 14 days of your return.
sneeze Through coughing and sneezing.
holding hands Close personal contact, such as touching or shaking hands.
touch face Touching an object or surface with the virus on it, then touching your mouth, nose, or eyes before washing your hands.
microscope Because novel coronavirus is new, the CDC and Los Angeles County Department of Public Health are learning more each day about the transmission patterns and incubation periods.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

fever

FEVER

sneeze

COUGH

difficulty breathing

DIFFICULTY BREATHING

severe illness

SEVERE ILLNESS

HOW CAN I PROTECT MYSELF AND MY FAMILY?

BE PREPARED!
Wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds and frequently.
Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer, but handwashing is better.
When coughing/sneezing, cover your mouth with your sleeve or a tissue (throw the tissue away immediately).
Clean doorknobs and frequently touched surfaces.
Practice social distancing (masks are limited value unless you are sick or a health worker). Limit close contact and avoid other social norms, such as shaking hands, hugs and other close contact in the foreseeable future. Elbow bumps are a good alternative.
Have provisions that will last a few days (water, food, essential hygiene supplies, etc.)
Get immunized against the flu. This will relieve what could be a highly impacted healthcare system.
Stay home when you’re sick. Don’t wait until you are VERY sick.

Doing these things will go a long way to protect individuals.

DOWNLOAD INFORMATION SHEETS AND SAFETY TIPS

Los Angeles Information Sheets:

State of California Safety Tips:

  • Prepare for Public Health Emergencies: Safety Tips for All ENGLISH | SPANISH   

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Information in this section has been provided by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. As they are working directly with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), please visit their website for the most accurate and up-to-date information.

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT COVID-19 (CORONAVIRUS)

(3/23/20)

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT COVID-19 AND THE 3/21/20 SAFER AT HOME ORDER: FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Download County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health Safer at Home Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ): ENGLISH | SPANISH  

 

THE BOTTOM LINE

Residents of the City of San Fernando are required to stay at home or in their place of residence, except when they need to work at an Essential Business or Healthcare Operation, provide Essential Infrastructure, shop at an Essential Business, or engage in an Essential Activity. On those occasions when you are out of your home for necessary tasks, stay at least six feet away from others.

 

FOR MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC, WHAT THIS MEANS IS THAT YOU SHOULD:

  • Stay home (stay unexposed and do not expose others).
  • Only go out for essential services or if you are an essential worker.
  • Stay six feet or more away from others.
  • Not gather in groups. 

 

THE ORDER, WHICH IS IN EFFECT UNTIL APRIL 19, 2020, SPECIFICALLY:

  • Prohibits all indoor public and private gatherings and events among persons not in the same household in Los Angeles County, including the City of San Fernando.
  • Requires all businesses to stop in-person operations and close to the public, unless the business is defined as an Essential Business. It specifically requires all indoor malls and shopping centers, all swap meets and flea markets, all indoor and outdoor playgrounds, and all non-essential businesses to close.
  • Requires Essential Businesses that are not required to close to the public to practice social distancing to the extent possible and infection control precautions listed in the Order.
  • Requires all restaurants to only prepare and offer food that is provided to customers via delivery service, via pick-up for take out dining, and via drive-thru. Restaurants may not provide indoor or outdoor table service. 

This Order doesn’t prevent any individual or family from engaging in passive recreational or outdoor activities, such as hiking, walking, jogging, or biking, so long as all persons practice social distancing to the extent possible.

Because the Order may be updated or extended, all residents should consult Public Health’s website (www.publichealth.lacounty.gov) daily until the Order is ended, and follow any updated requirements.

 

WHAT TYPES OF BUSINESSES ARE REQUIRED TO TEMPORARILY CLOSE TO THE PUBLIC?

The Safer at Home Order requires the immediate temporary closure to the public of all businesses that are not considered Essential Businesses. Essential Businesses are businesses that perform services that are essential to the well-being of the State’s residents.

Some examples of non- essential businesses that are required to close include:

  • Bars and Nightclubs.
  • Movie theaters, drive-in theaters, live performance venues, concert halls, arenas, and stadiums.
  • Bowling alleys and arcades.
  • Gyms and fitness centers.
  • Wineries, Breweries, and Tap Rooms (portion that offers public beverage consumption).
  • Personal grooming centers such as nail or hair salons.
  • Golf Courses, Tennis, Volleyball and Basketball Courts.
  • Smoke and Tobacco Shops.
  • Clothing stores.
  • Car Wash businesses.
  • Indoor malls and shopping centers (with the exception of Essential Businesses that can be accessed from the exterior of the indoor mall).
  • Indoor and outdoor children’s playgrounds (except for those located within childcare centers).
  • Flea Markets and Swap Meets. 

 

WHAT TYPES OF BUSINESS ARE NOT REQUIRED TO CLOSE TEMPORARILY TO THE PUBLIC?

Only Essential Businesses are not required to temporarily close to the public. There are many types of businesses and services that are considered essential, which may remain open to meet the needs of residents as long as everyone practices social distancing to the extent possible.

Examples include:

  • Stores that sell groceries and other products that are necessary to maintain the safety, sanitation, and essential operation of residences
  • Organizations and businesses that provide shelter, social services, and other necessities of life.
  • Banks, Credit Unions, financial institutions, and insurance companies.
  • Gas stations and convenience stores.
  • Hardware stores, building supply stores, auto repair shops, and bicycle repair shops.
  • Plumbers, electricians, property managers, gardeners/landscapers, security personnel, and funeral homes/mortuaries.
  • Laundromats, dry cleaners, businesses that provide mailing and shipping services.
  • Hotels, motels, and shared rental units.
  • Airlines, ride-share services, taxis, and other private transportation services.
  • Businesses that ship, truck or provide logistical support for the delivery of groceries, food, goods or services directly to residents, Essential Businesses, Healthcare Operations and Essential Infrastructure.
  • Hospitals, clinics, public health centers, and other licensed health care providers.
  • Construction services and activities for public, commercial, and residential property.
  • Professional services, such as payroll, accounting, and legal, when necessary to assist in compliance with legally mandated activities.
  • Businesses that assist with the inspection, recording, and transfer of residential and commercial property.
  • Educational institutions (if facilitating distance learning).
  • Businesses that support transportation needs.
  • Childcare centers.
  • Home-based care providers for some groups.
  • Entities that perform work essential for national security.
  • Healthcare Operations. See the Order for a list of what are considered to be Healthcare operations.
  • Essential Infrastructure providers. See the Order for a list of what are considered to be Essential Infrastructure providers.

Click Here for the full list of Essential Businesses, see section 13 of the Order. For a list of what are considered to be Healthcare Operations and Essential Infrastructure, see Section 15 of the Order. 

 

CAN I LEAVE MY HOME?

Yes. The public can leave home to access essential services (i.e., those that meet basic human needs) like buying groceries; getting necessary supplies at a hardware store; helping someone else get necessary supplies; going to the doctor; picking up a prescription; taking children to daycare; getting pet supplies or taking a pet to a veterinarian; going to a bank or credit union; or accessing court, social and administrative services. However, you should minimize the number of trips, stay at least 6 feet from others whenever possible, and stay at home if you have fever or respiratory symptoms.

Employees who work for an essential business (i.e., government workers and private-sector workers employed by Essential Businesses or Essential Infrastructure) are also allowed to leave the home to go to work.
Individuals and families can also participate in outdoor activities such as hiking or walking as long as they can stay at least 6 feet from others while doing so.

 

CAN I LEAVE MY HOME TO TAKE MY CHILDREN, DEPENDENTS, OLDER FAMILY MEMBERS OR THOSE WITH DISABILITIES TO NECESSARY APPOINTMENTS LIKE HEALTHCARE OR SOCIAL SERVICE VISITS?

Yes, as long as you use social distancing as much as possible, you can leave your home to care for these
individuals, including taking them to necessary appointments.

 

I WAS ISSUED A COURT ORDER. CAN I LEAVE MY HOME IN ORDER TO COMPLY WITH THIS?

Yes. Travel outside the home in order to comply with court or enforcement orders are allowed.

 

CAN I GO TO WORK?

Government employees and private-sector workers employed by Essential Businesses, Healthcare Operations or Essential Infrastructure are allowed to and should go to work. Click Here for a list of workers determined by the State Health Officer to be critical infrastructure workers, who can continue to go to work.

If you are able to go to work, check with your employer about social distancing, alternative work schedules, or any other practices that they may have put into place to help protect you and the people that you serve.

 

CAN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS REMAIN OPEN?

Yes, for purposes of facilitating distance learning, providing meals for pick-up, or performing essential functions while following social distancing.

 

CAN INDIVIDUALS CONTINUE TO STAY IN DORMS, SHELTERS OR OTHER CONGREGATE SETTINGS?

Yes, as long as they maintain social distancing and follow the institution’s measures to reduce the spread of disease.

 

IS IT OK TO TAKE PUBLIC TRANSIT, RIDE-SHARING SERVICES (E.G., LYFT OR UBER) OR WAIT AT BUS STOPS OR METRO STATIONS FOR TRANSIT?

You should limit travel outside of the home to those activities that are considered essential but you can take public transportation or use ride-sharing services as long as you maintain at least 6 feet of space from others.

 

CAN I TAKE MY CHILD TO THE PARK?

Yes, as long as you try to maintain social distancing from others at the park. However, both indoor and outdoor playgrounds and other park amenities are not allowed to stay open.

 

CAN I CALL A PLUMBER TO FIX A LEAKY PIPE OR CLOGGED TOILET?

Yes. You are allowed to continue to get services that are needed to maintain the safety and sanitation of your home.

 

AM I ALLOWED TO CARE FOR A FAMILY MEMBER OR PET AT SOMEONE ELSE’S HOME?

Yes. You are allowed to provide care and services for vulnerable and dependent people or animals. However, you should take precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19, such as ensuring you don’t have a fever or symptoms of illness before leaving to provide care, keeping at least 6 feet from others whenever possible, and frequently washing your hands, including immediately after entering their home or using hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol.

 

CAN I STILL LEAVE HOME TO DONATE BLOOD?

Yes. You can continue to give blood at Red Cross centers and at blood donation sites.
Blood drives are not prohibited by the Safer at Home or other Los Angeles County Orders, as long as social distancing practices are implemented to the maximum extent possible. Like a hospital, grocery store, or pharmacy, a blood drive is essential to ensuring the health of the community. Red Cross will continue to hold blood drives to help meet patient needs and has implemented new measures that ensure that blood drives and donation centers are even safer for donors and staff. Practicing social distancing and donating blood are not mutually exclusive, but they both will help to keep community members healthy by slowing the spread of the COVID-19 virus and by ensuring that patients across the country receive lifesaving blood.

 

IS THERE GUIDANCE AVAILABLE FOR RETAIL FOOD FACILITIES, SUCH AS RESTAURANTS?

Yes. Click Here to download a tailored guidance document for retail food facilities is available from Public Health.  It describes the requirements of the Order.

 

HOW CAN I GET MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE SAFER AT HOME ORDER AND THE REQUIRED SOCIAL DISTANCING AND INFECTION CONTROL PRECAUTIONS?

  • Click Here to download the Order from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. You can also view the Order at the Kenneth Hahn Hall of Administration or request a copy by calling the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health at (323) 914-7801, Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, or by leaving a message after-hours at (323) 914-9358.
  • Visit the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health COVID-19 website, at www.publichealth.lacounty.gov/media/Coronavirus/ for a variety of resources that address infection control and social distancing guidance such as press releases, FAQs, cleaning recommendations; and guidance documents that are tailored to businesses, schools, colleges and universities, and food facilities.
  • Call 2-1-1 (LA County Information Line). 

 

WHAT ELSE CAN YOU DO TO HELP PREVENT THE SPREAD OF COVID-19?

As we face the increased spread of COVID-19, Public Health is calling on every person and every organization to do their part to help slow its spread. In addition to the social distancing measures required in the Safer at Home Order, Public Health continues to recommend that everyone in the county adopt the following protective measures, to protect themselves, their families, and the people who are most vulnerable to infection.

  • Avoid non-essential travel.
  • If you are mildly sick, stay home for at least seven days or until 72 hours after being fever free, whichever is longer. Call your doctor if you are concerned and/or your symptoms worsen. Individuals who are elderly, have underlying health conditions or pregnant should consider contacting their providers earlier when they are sick.
  • Exclude employees and visitors with any fever and/or respiratory infection symptoms and from all schools, businesses, and work-related activities.
  • Follow all social distancing recommendations issued by Public Health. 

Additional recommendations, including tailored recommendations for different organizations, are posted at www.publichealth.lacounty.gov/media/Coronavirus/.

 

ARE NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS ALLOWED TO CONTINUE OPERATING?

Only those that provide essential services as described in the Safer At Home Order can remain open. This would include non-profits operating food pantries, providing housing and services for homeless residents, and many other critical services.

 

CHILDCARE FACILITIES ARE ALLOWED TO REMAIN OPEN. ARE THERE ANY SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS FOR THEM?

Childcare facilities must follow these requirements:

  • Childcare must be carried out in stable groups of twelve (12) or fewer. “Stable” means the same twelve (12) or fewer children are in the same group each day. Children cannot change from one group to another.
  • If more than one group of children is cared for at once site/facility, each group must be in a separate room and these groups cannot mix with each other.
  • Each childcare provider must be solely with one group of children.
  • Playgrounds within a childcare facility may be used by the children being cared for at that facility. 

 

WHAT INFECTION CONTROL PRACTICES ARE ESSENTIAL BUSINESSES REQUIRED TO FOLLOW?

All Essential Businesses that are not required to close to the public, including government agencies, are required to practice the following infection control precautions:

  • Practice social distancing by requiring patrons, visitors, and employees to be separated by six (6) feet, to the extent feasible.
  • Provide access to handwashing facilities with soap and water or hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol.
  • Post a sign in a conspicuous place at the public entry to the venue instructing members of the public to not enter if they are experiencing symptoms of respiratory illness, including fever or cough.
  • Adhere to communicable disease control recommendations provided by Public Health.

 

IS THIS ORDER MANDATORY? WHAT HAPPENS IF I DON’T COMPLY?

Yes. This is a legally enforceable order. It is against the law to violate this Order, and you may be punished by a fine or imprisonment for doing so.

 

WHY DID THE LOS ANGELES COUNTY HEALTH OFFICER ISSUE THE SAFER AT HOME HEALTH OFFICER ORDER?

California law gives the Health Officer the authority to take protective measures that are necessary to protect against the spread of disease. In the absence of a specific vaccine or a specific treatment for COVID-19 and with increasing cases, limiting the chances for close contact between persons is the best and only way to interrupt the spread of COVID-19 and protect the public.

Orders are based on scientific evidence and best practices. Public health experts recommend social distancing (increasing the space between people) to stop or slow down the spread of contagious diseases, such as COVID-19.

 

HOW LONG WILL THE SAFER AT HOME ORDER BE IN EFFECT?

This Order is in effect through April 19, 2020. Public Health will continue to monitor the rate of COVID-19 disease spread, the severity of the resulting illnesses and deaths, California Department of Public Health (CDPH) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations, and the need for additional measures. If needed, the Health Officer may extend, expand, or modify the Order to protect the public’s health.

 

Please visit this webpage and the City’s social media for additional information and future updates.

HEAVY WIND

When high wind advisories have been issued, the City of San Fernando encourages residents to take simple steps necessary to protect themselves from injury and their property from damage. 

DOWNED POWER LINES

Heavy winds can cause power lines to fall. This can create hazards – electrifying puddles, wet grass, and the surrounding area. Don’t touch anyone or anything in contact with a downed power line. Always assume downed power lines are energized and dangerous.

CALL 911 IMMEDIATELY

FALLEN TREES & BRANCHES

Report fallen trees or fallen branches to the Public Works Department.

(818) 898-1293

or

PWDispatch@sfcity.org 

POWER OUTAGE

Stay informed about power outages in your neighborhood. Contact Southern California Edison for current information.

(800) 611-1911

or

WWW.SCE.COM 

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

With a population of 25,145 residents, the City of San Fernando values the great responsibility to protect the public while ensuring residents have the tools and resources they need to strengthen their preparedness for emergencies and natural disasters.  Being housed in the County of Los Angeles, the City of San Fernando is vulnerable to the detrimental effects of earthquakes and cannot understate the importance of resident readiness. The City of San Fernando is dedicated to providing leadership to improve the community’s ability to BE READY for the next earthquake.

  • Mission: To provide City of San Fernando residents with tools and resources to prepare, respond and recover from an earthquake.
  • Vision: A thriving and earthquake ready City of San Fernando.
  • Are you Ready? Southern California has approximately 10,000 (unfelt) earthquakes every year.

If an earthquake hit tonight, would you be prepared? Earthquakes strike with no warning, NOW is the time to PREPARE so you can RESPOND and RECOVER.  Check out these resources to help you, friends, family, and co-workers BE READY.

Community

  • Alert LA County (website) – Los Angeles County emergency mass notification system that will notify residents and businesses of emergencies or critical situations and provide information regarding necessary actions, such as evacuations.
  • Emergency Network Los Angeles (website) – A network of Los Angeles County, non profit, community based organizations that provide assistance to individuals, families, and organizations following emergencies and disasters.
  • Earthquake Preparedness Video: Learn how to prepare your family for the next “big one!”

Family

  • Be a Hero (Website)- Kids can play games and test their knowledge.

School Based

  • Be a Hero (Website)- Kids can play games and test their knowledge.

Worksite

Training Available

  • CERT Training (website) – Free training is available to help you, friends, family, and co-workers learn how to effectively and efficiently respond an emergency.

FIRE AND EVACUATION PREPAREDNESS

Wildfires can occur anywhere and can destroy homes, businesses, infrastructure, natural resources, and agriculture.
 

The City of San Fernando encourages residents to prepare and protect themselves and their property and to take steps now so they may act quickly when family, homes, or businesses are in danger. 

What to do "NOW" to prepare for a fire

How to prepare for a wildfire

Protecting yourself today means having sources for information, preparing your home or workplace, developing an emergency communications plan, and knowing what to do when a wildfire is approaching your home or community. Taking action today can save lives and property.

  • Keep evacuation vehicle gas tank full.
  • Practice family fire drill and evacuation plans.
  • Practice STOP, DROP, and ROLL (should clothes catch on fire).
  • Prepare a list of valuables to take with you (store together, if possible).
  • Make a video of belongings, talking about each (save in cloud).
  • Take still pictures of all belongings as a backup (save in the cloud)
  • Document an annotated list of belongings.
  • Develop outdoor water supply with hoses to reach entire house, nozzle, and pump.
  • Have fire tools, ladder, and fire extinguishers available.
  • Post name/address signs clearly visible from street or road.
  • Post load limits on access bridges.
  • Clear driveway to at least 20 feet wide with 15 feet vertical clearance (for emergency vehicles).
  • Clear weeds and cut grass within 10 feet of structures, propane tanks, utility boxes.
  • Clear debris from roof and gutters.
  • Clear vegetation from within 3 feet of hydrants.
  • Remove trees growing through porch, deck, or roof.
  • Remove trash and debris accumulations.
  • Remove branches that overhang within 15 feet of roof and chimney.
  • Stack firewood uphill or on a contour at least 30 feet away from house.
  • Thin and prune your trees and brush.
  • Install smoke detectors and test quarterly.
  • Install only non-combustible roof material.
  • Install shutters, fire curtains, or heavy drapes on windows.
  • Install screens on foundation and eave vents.
  • Install enclosed sides on stilt foundations and decks.
  • Install chimney screen or spark arrestor.

Click Here to download a printable WHAT TO DO “NOW” TO PREPARE FOR A FIRE Checklist

Ten things Firefighters tell their own families about how to prepare

  • Have an emergency supply kit ready and in your car. Make sure valuables are in a secure location, either in a safe or packed securely in your vehicle.
  • Keep your car’s gas tank full. Park facing out and keep car keys in an accessible location.
  • Have two ways out of your community in case one way is blocked by fire.
  • Decide on a pre-established meeting location and out of area contact person in case of separation.
  • Plan ahead, prepare pets for transport and think about moving them to a safe location early, especially large pets and livestock.
  • Stay tuned to local media, verified social media accounts and emergency notification systems.
  • Connect with your neighbors and share verified information.
  • If you do not feel safe, then don’t wait to evacuate! Those with young children, elderly and people with disabilities in the home should plan ahead and evacuate early.
  • If a fire starts near you, follow all emergency personnel direction. Leave as soon as evacuation is ordered by emergency officials or if you feel unsafe to avoid being caught in fire, smoke or road congestion.
  • Stay calm and stay alert!

What to do when a wildfire threatens your area - Evacuation Plan

When a wildfire threatens your area, the best action to protect yourself and your family is to evacuate early to avoid being trapped. If there is smoke, drive carefully because visibility may be reduced. Keep your headlights on and watch for other vehicles and fleeing wildlife or livestock.

  • Fill evacuation vehicle gas tank.
  • Park evacuation vehicle heading toward street and travel route.
  • Close evacuation car windows but do not lock car and leave keys in ignition.
  • Close garage door but leave it unlocked (disconnect automatic garage door opener).
  • Establish an evacuation plan, travel route, probable destination.
  • Determine where separated members will meet.
  • Follow any official agency’s evacuation instructions.
  • Turn off natural gas at meter.
  • Disconnect propane tank.
  • Close or cover outside vents and shutters.
  • Remove combustible items from around the outside of house. 
  • Turn off appliances, thermostats, fireplaces, stoves.
  • Leave one light on in each general area so firefighters can see your house in dark and smoke.
  • Release any livestock in the area.
  • Close fire resistant window coverings, heavy drapes, and blinds.
  • Move overstuffed furniture away from windows.
  • Close sliding glass doors into the center of the house (don’t lock them).
  • Remove lace, nylon, or light material drapes and curtains.
  • Place ladder against the roof of the house on the side opposite the approaching fire.
  • Fill bathtubs, sinks, and containers with water.
  • Soak burlap sacks, small rugs, or large rags in containers.
  • Turn on exterior lights.
  • Lock doors and windows.
  • If instructed, tie large white cloth to front door knob.
  • Don’t tie up telephone lines (notify friends and relatives by text or email where to contact you).
  • Make safety equipment obvious for firefighters (spigots, ladders, chain saws, hoses, etc.).
  • Plug air vents and openings that are closee to the ground.
  • Prepare an “information note” to leave on the door detailing who you are, where you have gone, where flammables are (such as lawnmower gas, ammo, chemicals – move them all into one place).

Click Here for a printable WHAT TO DO BEFORE LEAVING – FIRE EVACUATION Checklist 

Click Here to for a printable EVACUATE! Worksheet

After a fire

Once the local fire or law enforcement authorities say that it is safe, you may return to your home.

  • For several hours after the fire, maintain a “fire watch.” Check and re-check for smoke, sparks or hidden embers throughout the house, including the roof and the attic.
  • Use caution when entering burned areas as hazards may still exist, including hot spots, which can flare up without warning. Evacuate immediately if you smell smoke.
  • When cleaning your home, wear a NIOSH certified-respirator (dust mask) and wet debris down to minimize breathing dust particles.
  • Discard any food that has been exposed to heat, smoke or soot.
  • Do NOT use water that you think may be contaminated to wash dishes, brush teeth, prepare food, wash hands, or to make ice or baby formula.
  • Photograph damage to your property for insurance purposes.
The 6 P's
Wildfires: Protect Yourself and Your Community
Wildfires: Protect Yourself and Your Community

STORM AND HEAVY RAIN PREPAREDNESS

When storms or heavy rain is expected, the City of San Fernando encourages residents to take simple steps necessary to protect themselves from injury and their property from storm damage.
 

When rainstorms impact the San Fernando area, flood control channels, arroyos and other low-lying areas can quickly fill with fast-moving water, creating a life threatening danger. It is against the law to be inside a flood control channel.

Flood Prevention and Storm Preparedness Tips

  • Ensure that your drains, gutters and downspouts are clean and functioning properly. This is especially important for flat-roofed buildings.
  • Keep stormwater troughs, pipes and culverts on your property free of debris.
  • Move valuable or easily damaged items away from low-lying areas prone to flooding.
  • Secure trash containers, household waste, chemical spills and outdoor storage before they are swept away, spread contamination or block storm drains.
  • Closely examine windows, skylights and doors that may benefit from caulking or weatherstripping.
  • Inspect your attic for “leaks” of sunlight, or signs of previous water damage that may indicate where pre-storm repairs are needed.
  • Establish household supplies (bucket, mop, towel and tarpaulin) to minimize damage from a sudden leak or stormwater seepage.
  • Prepare your household to remain safe (battery powered lamps, no candles) and functional (fully charged cell phone, manual garage door operation) in the event of a storm related power outage.
  • Review how to safely turn off your home’s electric, water and natural gas service in the event of severe storm damage.
  • Put the Flood Safety and other free Mobile Apps from the American Red Cross on your smartphone.
  • Discuss your Family Emergency Plan, including what every member of the family will do in the event of a flood or mudslide.
  • Prepare an Emergency Supply Kit that includes food, water, medications, flashlight, battery-powered radio, rain gear and first aid supplies.
  • Gather and safely store important documents to take with you in case of evacuation.
  • Confirm out-of-state family contacts so that friends and relatives can determine your location and status.
  • Consider the safety of those with disabilities or access and functional needs.
  • Plan for the needs of pets at home and if you are evacuated.
  • Identify multiple safe routes from your home or workplace to high ground and practice your evacuation plan.
  • Have sturdy, sensible shoes with nonskid soles for use in a rainstorm. Pack an umbrella, small flashlight and rain coat.
  • Check your car’s wipers, lights, tire inflation and tread wear to assure safe operation, and keep your vehicle fueled in case power is cutoff to local fueling stations.
  • Be prepared to monitor local news for official warnings, evacuation orders and the status of streets, highways and transit systems.
  • Be aware of local driving laws, and how to operate your vehicle safely or use public transit in conditions altered by weather.
  • Lower the level of your swimming pool to prevent overflow and flooding.
  • Determine if your home is located in a flood hazard or landslide prone area.
  • Landscape slopes with plants that are fire retardant, water wise, suitable for erosion control and allow for smart water retention or reuse. Consider the temporary use of plastic sheeting on slopes prone to erosion.
  • Large trees that could threaten your home should be examined by a certified arborist. Confirm that any hillside on your property has been evaluated by a licensed soil engineer.
  • If necessary, consult an engineer or licensed contractor to design or build permanent water and debris control systems for your property.
  • Contact your insurance agent to assure that your flood and storm coverage is adequate and in effect. Confirm the 24-hour contact, policy and claim filing numbers for your insurer(s). Place that information in your mobile phone and keep a printed copy in the glove box of your car.
  • Keep sandbags, plywood, plastic sheeting, lumber, hand tools and other materials handy for addressing additional stormwater issues.

Personal Safety During a Storm or Flood

  • When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors!
  • Limit non-essential travel, and avoid the urge to sightsee. Remind all household members not to play or linger near catch basins, canyons, flood control channels or storm drains.
  • Do not walk through flowing water. Drowning is the leading cause of flood deaths, mostly during flash floods. Currents can be deceptive; six inches of moving water can knock you off your feet.
  • Never drive through a flooded area where you cannot see the pavement, or bypass road barriers.
  • If you become stranded in your car by moving water, stay with your vehicle and move to the hood or roof if water continues to rise.
  • Stay away from power lines and electrical wires. Deadly electric current can travel through water.
  • Report downed power lines in the City of San Fernando to the Southern California Edison (800.611.1911). If the downed wires threaten life, call 911.

What should you do if you fall in moving water?

  • Remain calm. Don’t waste energy yelling for help after someone has spotted you.
  • Get ready to be rescued.
  • Try to float on your back with your legs straight and your feet pointed downstream.
  • Use your legs to shove yourself away from obstructions.
  • Keep your head up so that you can see where you are going.
  • Watch for obstacles and debris! If a tree or other stationary object is blocking the channel, forcing water over it, try to flip over on your stomach and approach the obstacle head-on, crawling over the top of it.
  • Most victims in swift water die when they get pinned against obstacles or get trapped in submerged debris and vegetation.

What if you see a person or pet fall into moving water?

  • Do not go into the water after the victim.
  • Do not try to pull the victim out with your hands, rope or similar device. Do not attach anything to yourself and toss it to a victim in the water. The force of the current will pull you in.
  • If possible, throw a floatation device to the victim, such as a boogie board, Styrofoam ice chest, basketball or other unattached object.
  • Immediately call 911.
  • Tell the 9-1-1 operator that a person or animal fell into the channel and is being swept downstream.
  • Give accurate information about where and when you saw the victim and what the victim was wearing.
  • Though members of your Los Angeles Fire Department are specially trained and equipped to respond to water rescues, not every victim survives. We therefore remind you that when it comes to swift moving water: ‘Stay Away and Stay Alive!’

Sandbags

  • Sandbags are available at 501 First Street, San Fernando. We’ll provide the sand and bags, but please bring a shovel (sorry, shovels keep disappearing).
  • Call San Fernando Public Works (818.898.1293) or email (PWDispatch@sfcity.org) for more info.
Click Here to download the City’s Storm Preparedness Brochure, it includes a useful emergency checklist.

WHAT IS 911? | ¿QUE ES EL 911?

Nine-one-one is the number to call to get help in a police, fire or medical emergency. A 911 call is transmitted over dedicated phone lines to the 911 answering point closest to the caller. Trained personnel then send emergency help as needed.

What is enhanced 911?

Enhanced 9-1-1 is a system which routes an emergency call to the 9-1-1 answering center closest to the caller and automatically displays the caller’s telephone number. Advanced systems can also display the caller’s address (only from a residence or business phone). The 9-1-1 call taker will ask the caller to verify the information that appears on his/her computer screen. Location information is not yet available for calls made from cellular phones or when rural callers have only a route and box number for an address.

When should you use 9-1-1?

9-1-1 is only to be used in emergency situations. An emergency is any situation which requires immediate response from the police, the fire department or an ambulance. If you are ever in doubt, call 9-1-1. It’s best to be safe and let the call taker determine if it’s an emergency.

Do NOT call 911:

  • For information
  • For directions
  • For directory assistance
  • For paying tickets
  • For your pet
  • As a prank
  • When you’re bored and just want to talk  

If you call 911 by mistake, do not hang up. Tell the call taker what happened so that he/she knows that there is no emergency.

What about prank 911 calls?

A prank call is when someone calls 911 for a joke, or calls 911 and hangs up. Prank calls not only waste time and money, but they can also be dangerous. If 911 lines or 911 call takers are busy with prank calls, someone with a real emergency may not be able to get the help they need. In some communities, it is considered illegal to make prank 911 calls.

How do you make a 911 call?

Dial 9, then 1 and 1 again. It is a free call. You can use any kind of phone — push button, rotary, cellular, cordless or pay phone (some pay phones may require coins to get a dial tone).

  • Stay calm and state your emergency
  • Speak loudly and clearly. Give the 911 call taker your name, address and phone number where help is needed.
  • Answer the call takers questions. Stay on the telephone if it is safe to do so, and do not hang up until the call taker tells you to do so.  

What if a 911 caller does not speak English?

When necessary, the 911 call taker can often add an interpreter or other language line service for translation. A non-English speaking caller may hear a short conversation in English and some clicking sounds as an interpreter is added to the 911 call.

What if a 911 caller is hearing or speech impaired?

Communication centers which answer 911 calls have special keypad telephones for responding to 911 calls from hearing or speech impaired callers.

If a caller uses TTY/TDD, the caller should:

  • Stay calm, place the phone receiver into the TTY, call 911.
  • After the call is answered, press the TTY keys several times. This may help shorten the time necessary to respond to the call.
  • Give the call taker time to connect their TTY. If necessary, press the keys of the TTY again. The 911 call taker will answer and type a “GA.”
  • Tell what is needed — police, fire department or ambulance. Give your name, phone number and address where help is needed.
  • Stay on the telephone if it is safe to do so. Answer the call taker’s questions. If a hearing or speech impaired caller does not have a TTY/TDD, the caller should:  

    • Call 911 and do not hang up. By not disconnecting leaves the line open. With most 911 calls, the caller’s address is displayed on the call taker’s screen and the police will be sent.

Wireless Phones:

As in the basic 911 instruction, we emphasize that children should be cautioned NOT TO PLAY WITH THE PHONE, practice dialing or make prank calls to 911. This is especially true with wireless phones for the following reasons:

  • Some telephones will automatically dial 911 if a programmed key is depressed.
  • The number of wireless 911 calls received often exceeds the resources of public safety answering points.
  • The 911 system is for emergencies only.  

How to dial:

NOTE: Wireless telephone handsets and procedures for making a call differ between models and manufactures. It is strongly suggested that children be instructed to discuss with their parents how to dial 911 calls from the wireless telephone they own or use. Children should be made aware of special function keys or speed dial features and all steps involved in making a 911 call.

LISTEN CAREFULLY: It is important to listen carefully, then speak loudly and clearly to the 911 dispatcher. If you receive a busy signal, hang up and call 911 again. If you hear a recorded message, DO NOT HANG UP. STAY ON THE PHONE UNTIL THE REAL OPERATOR ANSWERS.

NOTE: Children should be advised to listen carefully to what happens after they dial. Due to the number of calls received from wireless telephones, 911 calls sometimes get a busy signal or a recorded message before the call is answered by a live operator. Presenters should explain to children what to do if this occurs. For younger children, presenters may want to demonstrate the sound of a busy signal and give examples of the recorded message they might hear. One example of a recorded message is: “You have reached 911 emergency services. All operators are busy taking calls. Please stay on the line and your call will be answered by the first available call taker.” It is critical that children understand that if they hang up when they hear the recording and then redial, their call will go to the end of the waiting queue.

What to say:

  • Explain what is wrong-what type of emergency it is (i.e. fire, injury, accident, crime in progress).
  • Explain what type of help you need-fire, police, ambulance.
  • Explain where help is needed- location of the emergency.
  • Give your name and telephone number so that the operator is able to call you back if your call is disconnected. You may be asked to give your home address for reporting purposes. 

How to describe where you are located:

  • Look for street names, big signs, or buildings you know.
  • Tell the dispatcher where you were coming from, where you are now and where you were going to (i.e. we left home to go to grandma’s house).
  • Tell the dispatcher if you are in a car, walking, or riding a bike, in a store, etc.   

If you accidentally call 911:

  • DO NOT HANG UP.
  • Stay on the telephone until the dispatcher answers.
  • Explain that you accidentally called 911 and there is no emergency.
  • You will not be in trouble if you accidentally call 911. DO NOT hang up.  

NOTE: As a matter of policy, if the 911 center receives the call back number on disconnect, an operator will attempt to call back to determine if there is a true emergency. Stress to the children that it is better to stay on the phone and tell the operator that they accidentally called 911. Eliminating the need for call back saves valuable call taker time for other emergency calls.

Do not play with the phone:

Children should be cautioned in the strongest terms against playing with wireless phones.

NOTE: Current statistics indicate that greater than 70% or more of all 911 calls made from wireless phones are accidentally dialed or are non-emergency in nature. Accidentally dialed 911 calls, particularly from certain models of wireless phones, have become a huge problem for 911 communication centers. In fact, one handset model will automatically dial 911 if the “9” key is depressed for more than two seconds. These calls are generated without pressing the send key. Anyone playing with the key pad or even hesitating while dialing a number that starts with a “9” can make an unintentional 911 call. Other models have preprogrammed emergency buttons that can also be activated accidentally.

When a 911 center receives the caller identification with these calls, they attempt a call back to determine if there is an emergency. Answering these inadvertent calls and making the necessary calls back take valuable time that could keep operators from being available for true emergency calls.

El nueve-once es el número de teléfono para recibir asistencia policiaca, de incendio o emergencia médica. La llamada al 911 se trasmite sobre una línea telefónica dedicada al  centro del 9-1-1 más cercano. Personal entrenado  manda  la asistencia de emergencia necesaria.

No juegue con el telefono:

Los niños deben ser advertidos lo más posible de no jugar con teléfonos inalámbricos.

TOME NOTA: Estadísticas indican que más del 70% de llamadas al 911 hechas con teléfonos inalámbricos son llamadas accidentales o de no-emergencia. Llamadas accidentales al 911, particularmente de ciertos modelos de teléfonos inalámbricos, han creado un gran problema para centros de comunicaciones del 911. Por cierto, hay un tipo de celular que automáticamente marca al 911 si se oprime la tecla “9” por más de dos segundos. Estas llamadas son hechas sin oprimir la tecla para mandar una llamada. Cualquier persona que juegue con la tecla o se detiene a marcar un número telefónico que empieza con un “9” puede hacer una llamada al 911 sin querer. Otro tipo de teléfonos inalámbricos tiene botones pre programados de emergencia que pueden ser activada accidentalmente.

Cuando el centro del 911 recibe la identificación  con estas llamadas inadvertidas  la operadora  intenta  regresar para determinar si hay una emergencia.  El contestar estas  llamadas toman tiempo valioso que pueden impedir a la operadora contestar llamadas de verdaderas emergencias.

Si usted llama al 911 accidentalmente:

  • NO CUELGUE.
  • Quédese en línea hasta que su llamada sea contestada.
  • Explique que llamo al 911 accidentalmente y no hay ninguna emergencia.
  • No será castigado por llamar al 911 accidentalmente. NO CUELGUE.  

TOME NOTA: Como póliza, si el centro de emergencia recibe el número que llamo y desconecto, la operadora puede devolver la llamada al número que marco para verificar que no haiga ninguna emergencia. Enfatice a los niños que es mejor quedarse en línea y explicar a la operadora que marco el 911 accidentalmente. Al no tener que regresar la llamada ahorra tiempo valioso a la operadora para tomar otras llamadas de emergencia.

¿Como describir donde esta ubicado?

  • Busque nombre de calles, rótulos grandes o edificios que conoce.
  • Dígale a la operadora de donde venía, en donde está ahora, y hacia donde viajaba (Ejemplo: Salimos de casa para ir a la casa de la abuela).
  • Dígale a la operadora si está cerca de un vehículo, caminando o montando a bicicleta, dentro de una tienda, etc.  

Que decir:

  • Explique que pasa-que tipo de emergencia tiene (incendio, accidente, crimen en progreso).
  • Explique que tipo de auxilio ocupa – bomberos, policía, ambulancia
  • Explique en donde se ocupa el auxilio- ubicación de emergencia.
  • De su nombre y número de teléfono a la operadora en caso de que su llamada sea desconectada. Le pueden pedir su domicilio por razones de reporte.  

Como marcar:

TOME NOTA: Llamadas hechas con audífonos de teléfonos inalámbricos y el proceso para hacer una llamada varea según el  modelo y fabricante. Se le sugiere que niños hablen con sus padres en como marcar al 911 de un teléfono inalámbrico que poséen o usan. Los niños deben ser advertidos de teclas con funciones especiales o  de teclas de marca inmediata y seguir todos los pasos para marcar al 911.

ESCUCHE CUIDASAMENTE: Es muy importante que escuche cuidadosamente, y luego hablar fuerte y claro a la operadora del 911. Si recibe una señal ocupada, cuelgue y vuelva a marcar al 911. Si escucha una grabación NO CUELGUE. QUEDESE EN LA LINEA HASTA QUE ALGUIEN CONTESTE.

TOME NOTA: Aconseje a los niños de escuchar cuidadosamente a lo que pasa después de marcar. Debido al alto número de llamadas que se reciben de teléfonos inalámbricos, las llamadas al 911 pueden recibir una señal ocupada o una grabación antes de que la llamada sea contestada por una operadora. Presentadores deben explicar a los niños que hacer si esto ocurre. Para niños pequeños de edad, el presentador puede mostrar el sonido de una línea ocupada y dar ejemplos de mensajes que puedan recibir. Un ejemplo de tal mensaje puede ser: “You have reached 911 emergency services. All operators are busy taking calls. Please stay on the line and your call will be answered by the first available call taker.” (“Usted A llamado al servicio de emergencias 911. Todas las operadora se encuentran ocupadas  tomando otras llamadas. Favor de mantenerse en línea y su llamada será contestada por la primera operadora disponible”). Es crítico que los niños entiendan que si cuelgan el teléfono al recibir una grabación y vuelven a marcar de nuevo, la llamada será puesta al final del orden de llamadas esperando ser atendidas.

Teléfonos Inalámbricos:

Asi como  en las instrucciones básicas del 911 se enfatiza que los  niños tengan cuidado y NO JUEGEN CON EL TELEFONO, practiquen marcar o hacer llamadas de broma al 911. Esto es cierto con teléfonos inalámbricos por las siguientes razones:

  • Algunos teléfonos marcan el 911 automáticamente si una tecla programada es presionada.
  • Si la cantidad de llamadas al 911 exceden los recursos de seguridad pública.
  • El sistema de 911 es para emergencias solamente.  

¿Qué hacer si la persona que llama tiene dificultades para oír o hablar?

Centros de comunicación que responden a llamadas del 9-1-1 tienen teléfonos con teclas especiales para asistir a personas que tengan dificultades para oír o hablar.

Si la persona utiliza TTY/TDD, debería:

  • Mantenerse calmada, poner el recibidor de teléfono en el TTY, llamar al 911.
  • Cuando su llamada sea contestada, oprima las teclas de TTY varias veces. Esto podría reducir el tiempo necesario para responder su llamada.
  • Dele tiempo a la operadora para conectarse al TTY. Si es necesario, oprima las teclas del TTY de nuevo. La operadora del 9-1-1 tomara su llamada y escribirá “GA.”
  • Dígale lo que necesita – servicio de policía, bomberos o ambulancia. Provee su nombre, numero de teléfono,  y dirección donde se necesita  asistencia.
  • Manténgase en el teléfono si es seguro. Responda a las preguntas de la operadora. Si usted tiene dificultades  para oír o hablar  y no tiene TTY/TDD:

    • Llame al 911 y no cuelgue. Al no desconectarse mantiene la línea abierta. Algunas llamadas al 911 muestran la dirección de la persona que llama en el pantalla de la operadora y envían a la policía.

¿Qué hacer si la persona que llama no habla inglés?

Cuando sea necesario, la operadora puede incluir un intérprete/traductor u otro servicio de lenguaje para traducir. Una persona que llama y  que no hable inglés podría escuchar una conversación corta en inglés y algunos clics cuando el intérprete sea agregado a la conversación.

¿Cómo hacer una llamada al 911?

Marque el 9, luego el 1, y el 1 otra vez. La llamada es gratis. Puede usar cualquier tipo de teléfono – de botón, rotativo, celular, inalámbrico o teléfono público (algunos teléfonos públicos pueden requerir monedas para hacer la llamada).

  • Manténgase calmado y explique su situación
  • Hable en voz alta y claro provea al operador del 911 su nombre, dirección, y numero de teléfono donde se necesita la asistencia.
  • Responda a todas las preguntas de la operadora. Manténgase en el teléfono siempre y cuando sea  seguro y cuelgue hasta que  la operadora le indique.

¿Qué tal las llamadas de broma al 911?

Una llamada de broma es cuando alguien llama al 911 de broma, o llama al 911 y cuelga el teléfono. Las llamadas de broma no solamente gastan tiempo y dinero, sino que también pueden ser peligrosas. Si las líneas o operadores del 911 están ocupadas con una llamada de broma, es posible que alguien con una emergencia no recibirá la asistencia que necesita. En algunas comunidades, es  ilegal hacer llamadas de broma al 911.

NO llame al 911:

  • Para información
  • Para direcciones
  • Para asistencia de directorio
  • Para pagar sus infracciones
  • Para su mascota
  • Como broma
  • Cuando esta aburrido y quiere hablar con alguien

Si llama al 911 por equivocación, no cuelgue el teléfono. Deje saber a la operadora lo que paso para que el/ella sepa que no hay una emergencia.

¿Cuándo debería usar el 911?

El 911 debe ser usado solamente para casos de emergencia. Una emergencia es cualquier situacion que requiere asistencia inmediata de policía, bomberos o ambulancia. Si tiene duda de cuando llamar, llame al 911. Es mejor estar seguro y dejar que la operadora determine si es una emergencia.

¿Qué es el 911 mejorado?

El 911 mejorado es un sistema que dirige una llamada de emergencia  al centro del 911 más cercano a la persona que llama y automáticamente muestra el número telefónico de la persona que llama. Sistemas avanzados también muestran la dirección de la persona que llama (solamente de un teléfono residencial o de comercio). La persona tomando la llamada del 911 verifica la información que se recibe en el monitor de la computadora. Información sobre la ubicación   de teléfonos celulares o cuando llama de un área rural con un numero de ruta o caja telefónica aún no está disponible.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

INCIDENT ARCHIVE

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON PUBLIC SAFETY POWER SHUTOFF

(10/30/19; 2:10 pm)

Power has been restored throughout the City. All traffic signals are operable.  

(10/30/19; 11:21 am)

City-wide survey of traffic signals was conducted. Currently, power is out at the below intersections. Stop signs are posted at all effected intersections and should be treated as four-way stops.

  • Chatsworth Dr & Celis St
  • Brand Blvd & Pico St
  • Brand Blvd & Mott St
  • Brand Blvd & Kewen
  • San Fernando Mission Blvd & OMelveny Street
  • Brand Blvd & Glenoaks Blvd
  • Griswold St & Glenoaks Blvd
  • Maclay Ave & Glenoaks Blvd
  • Arroyo St & Glenoaks Blvd
  • Maclay Ave & Seventh Street
  • Maclay Ave & Fifth Street
  • Maclay Ave & Fourth Street

PLEASE USE CAUTION WHEN DRIVING THROUGHOUT THE CITY.

(10/30/19; 9:49 am)

Power is out at Recreation Park (208 Park Avenue). The facility is closed to the public and all programs are cancelled for today.

(10/30/19; 8:30 am)

The City of San Fernando is experiencing a Public Safety Power Shutoff throughout portions of the city. Several intersections have lost power. INTERSECTIONS WITHOUT POWER SHOULD BE TREATED LIKE FOUR-WAY STOP SIGNS.

Intersections without power include the following:

  • Maclay Ave & Seventh St
  • Maclay Ave & Glenoaks Blvd
  • Glenoaks Blvd & Brand Blvd
  • Glenoaks Blvd & Griswold St
  • Glenoaks Blvd & Arroyo St
  • Brand Blvd & Pico St
  • Brand Blvd & Kewen St
  • Brand Blvd & Mott St
  • Celis St & Chasworth Dr
  • SF Mission Blvd & O’Melveny St

Public Works crews are placing stop signs at all effected intersections.

PLEASE USE CAUTION WHILE DRIVING THROUGHOUT THE CITY.

IF YOU SEE A DOWNED POWER LINE, STAY AWAY AND CALL 911!

Visit SCE’s website for the current shutoff status and how to prepare for an electric outage: https://www.sce.com/safety/wildfire/psps

Public Safety Power Shutoff

TICK FIRE

A fire ignited in the Santa Clarita region of Los Angeles on October 24, 2019. Firefighters continue to battle this wind driven fire as it jumped the 14 freeway overnight.
 

Current Status:

School Closures: Click here to visit the Los Angeles Unified School District website. 

Tick Fire

SADDLE RIDGE FIRE

A large brush fire ignited in the Sylmar region of Los Angeles on October 10, 2019, and grew to over 4,000 acres through the night. The fast moving fire was driven by winds in excess of 60MPH.
 

Current Status: Click here to visit the Los Angeles Fire Department website

Assistance for Property Owners: Click here for information from the Los Angeles County Assessor  

Saddleridge Brush Fire

CONTACT US

POLICE FACILITY
Police Department
910 First Street, San Fernando, CA 91340
Non-Emergency (818) 898-1267
extension 0 for Dispatcher

DETECTIVE BUREAU
Monday through Friday | 8:30 am to 5 pm
(818) 898-1256

RECORDS BUREAU
Monday through Friday | 8:30 am to 5:30 pm
(818) 898-1279

PROPERTY BUREAU
Monday through Friday | 8:30 am to 5 pm
(818) 898-1277

CITY HALL
117 Macneil Street, San Fernando, CA 91340
(818) 898-1200

PUBLIC WORKS
Monday through Thursday | 7:30 am to 5:30 pm
Friday | 8 am to 5 pm
(818) 898-1293  
 

After Hours Emergency
(818) 898-1267

CODE ENFORCEMENT
Monday through Thursday| 7:30 am to 5:30 pm
Friday | 8 am to 5 pm
(818) 898-1227

ANIMAL CARE & CONTROL
Los Angeles County
(661) 257-3191

What's New? -- Check out our latest and greatest